Panel Discussion: A Love/Hate relationship: Artists explore their fixation with the Art World as Subject

 

Thursday, February 3, 6:30 pm

Join us for a panel discussion featuring curator and artist Eric Doeringer in conversation with exhibiting artists Jennifer Dalton, Loren Munk, and William Powhida. The panelists will discuss their reasons for making art about the art world and the ways that their subject matter and art careers have influenced one other. 

 

Panelist Bios:

 

Eric Doeringer is a Brooklyn-based artist known for his “Bootleg” series and other aesthetic satires which explore the relationship between the copy and the original. Doeringer was commissioned by The Whitney Museum to create a multiple for their Initial Public Offerings program and has been included in exhibitions at the Museo De Arte Contemporaneo De Castilla Y Leon (MUSAC), The Bruce Museum, The Itami [Japan] Museum of Arts And Crafts, and Takashi Murakami’s GEISAI Miami artist fair.

 

Jennifer Dalton is a mixed media artist represented by Winkleman Gallery in New York. Her work studies the art world from a statistical perspective, exposing the disparities between coverage of male and female artists in Artforum, the fortunes and shopping habits of major art collectors, and the most under/overrated artists. Dalton recently collaborated with William Powhida on the #class exhibition at Winkleman Gallery, in which they transformed the gallery into a think tank/performance space/lecture hall for one month.

 

Loren Munk is a New York-based artist and critic originally from the great American West. In 1981 Loren's work debuted in SoHo; at about this time he moved his studio to Red Hook, Brooklyn. In addition to exhibiting in Brazil, France, Germany and the United States, Munk has received national and overseas public and private commissions. His criticism is published by the Brooklyn Rail and his video reviews of gallery shows appear on Babelgum.com.

 

William Powhida’s paintings and drawings sharply critique the art world. Now living and working in Brooklyn, Powhida has recently attained notoriety for his drawing critiquing the politics of the New Museum’s Skin Fruit exhibition, as well for “Hooverville” a detailed depiction of a shanty town erected outside of the Miami Beach Convention Center. He is represented by Charlie James Gallery in Los Angeles, and Platform Gallery in Seattle.