AGING AS ART and Performing for the Dead
Oct
3
6:30 PM18:30

AGING AS ART and Performing for the Dead

 Image courtesy of Linda Mary Montano

Image courtesy of Linda Mary Montano

AGING AS ART and Performing for the Dead
Wednesday, October 3rd, 2018
6:30 PM to 8 PM

An evening with Linda Mary Montano and Billy X. Curmano.

Using video and interactive performance, Linda Mary Montano and Billy X. Curmano will address their own experiences with aging and dying, culminating in participatory engagement with the audience. Montano sees her body as a canvas, a sculpture that is chiseled by time as she grows older, while Curmano has daringly orchestrated his own funeral in order to perform for the dead, as an act of self- transformation and a rite of passage. Together, these two artists will question the nature of mortality, to both confront and heal unspoken fears and terrors regarding the fear of dying and death itself.

PARTICIPANTS

Linda Mary Montano is a seminal figure in contemporary feminist performance art and her work since the mid 1960s has been critical in the development of video by, for, and about women. Attempting to dissolve the boundaries between art and life, Montano continues to actively explore her art/life through shared experience, role adoption, and intricate life altering ceremonies, some of which last for seven or more years. Her artwork is starkly autobiographical and often concerned with personal and spiritual transformation. Montano’s influence is wide ranging – she has been featured at museums including The New Museum in New York, MOCA San Francisco and the ICA in London.

Billy X. Curmano is an award winning artist/adventurer and former McKnight Foundation Interdisciplinary Art Fellow. He was trained as a painter and sculptor (If, of course, painters and sculptors can be trained). His more traditional objects have been exhibited both here and abroad since a first solo show at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee in 1970. Notably, some of his paintings represented the USA in the “III Vienna Graphikbiennale” (Austria). His works have also found their way to the Museum of Modern Art in New York and other prestigious collections. Billy X. came to music through the back door using soundscapes in “live art” and is probably best known for edgy performances. His more eccentric pieces include a 3-day live burial, 2,000 plus mile Mississippi River Swim, 40-day Death Valley Desert Fast and a sojourn to the Arctic Circle on public transport. He’s won awards for performance and film as well as a solo CD. Billy X. has toured every way imaginable including 6,200 miles and 15 cities in 45 days on a Greyhound Bus and intrigued audiences from the Dalai Lama's World Festival of Sacred Music in Los Angeles to New York City's famed Franklin Furnace. He's been a "Pick of the Week" in the L.A. Weekly and on the City Pages "A List". Journalists have dubbed him the court jester of Southern Minnesota. He has been fortunate to study briefly with John Cage, Rachel Rosenthal, Babtundi Olatunji and Joseph Shabalala.

This event takes place in conjunction with As Far as the Heart Can See (September 21 – November 17, 2018).

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In Honor Of …
Oct
20
1:00 PM13:00

In Honor Of …

 Image courtesy of Amelia Iaia

Image courtesy of Amelia Iaia

In Honor Of
Saturday, October 20, 2018
1:00 – 5:00 PM

A performance series in the gallery hosted in conjunction with EFA Open Studios. Performers were nominated by artists featured in As Far as the Heart Can See, and include former mentees, current students, assistants, and younger artists whose work they admire: Nina Isabelle, Sindy Butz, Elena Bajo, Xinan (Helen) Ran, and Larissa Gilbert.

PARTICIPANTS

Nina A. Isabelle is a multidisciplinary artist working with action and perception. By incorporating physical movement, modified technology, art and non-art objects she builds systems of action designed to intuit site-specific information by tethering the collective, personal, and regional relative narratives that drive the performance space machine toward trajectories of new perception, belief, and possibilities. ninaisabelle.com/

Sindy Butz is an interdisciplinary visual artist, artistic researcher and educator. Butz's art practice is project based and spans the disciplines of performance art, sculptural installation, performance based photography and video art, video sculpture and coaching and consulting through art and movement. She was born in the communist German Democratic Republic and raised in the suburbs of East Berlin. Butz is living and working in New York since 2009. She received her B.F.A. in sculpture from the AKI- ARTez Netherlands, a M.F.A. in Art in Context from the Institute of Art in Context, University of the Arts (UdK), Berlin Germany. In 2009, she was a fellow of the German Academic Exchange Program with a DAAD Jahresstipendium to research at the Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) at New York University on wearable art. Her work has been presented at the Brooklyn Museum, New York; Fountain Art Fair Miami and New York; Select Art Fair, New York;  Alice Austen Museum, New York; Rush Arts Gallery, New York; Museum der Dinge, Berlin (DE), Korean Experimental Performance Festival KOPAS, Seoul (South KOR) among others. She has been awarded Artist in Residence in Schloss Plüschow, Germany (2007), Chill Rialaig, South Ireland (2007) and Hwaseong, South Korea (2008). In parallel to her art practice, her dance enthusiasm has lead her to the position of a principal dancer at the New York Butoh Dance Company, Vangeline Theater since 2010. She has performed with the company at venues such as the Brooklyn Museum, New York (USA), El Museo del Barrio, New York (USA), and Bronx Academy of Art and Dance, New York (USA). Butz studied Dance Theater and Ballet since the age of 6 and is currently pursuing a dance teacher certification of the Maureen Fleming Technique to realize her upcoming art project “Engine of Memory.”

Elena Bajo was born in Madrid (SP) and lives and works in Los Angeles and Berlin. Her concept-generated and research based practice is concerned with the social and political dimensions of everyday spaces, the strategies to conceptualize resistance, the poetics of ideologies, and the relationship between temporalities and subjectivities. She works individually and collectively across installation, sculpture, painting, performance, participatory events, film, text and writing. She uses exhibition spaces as studios or laboratories where an experimental, itinerant, site-specific performed work can unfold, building improvised actions and choreographed movements. Using art production processes as her point of departure, Bajo works with places as they are given to her and is limited by the materials available in and/or around them. She rearranges these found elements into new compositions, juxtaposing the identities of prefigured social and political spaces and dimensions, creating a, sometimes, cryptic but always revealing new code of signifiers. Bajo presents to her viewers a re-staging of a space and time, of the past, into future events that uses chance, contingency and ambiguity of the moment. Recent solo exhibitions La Femme Radicale or The Point of No Return, 2013, D+T Project Brussels (BE); The Absence of Work, 2012, Platform3, Munich (DE); The Factory of Forms, 2012, Manifesta Parallel, Genk (BE) and group shows Zero Hours, Art Sheffield 2013 Sheffield UK; Original Doubtat Plataforma Revolver, Lisbon; Throw a Rock and see what happens, Casa Encendida, Madrid; Vers une Hypothese Fort Du Bruissin Xll Lyon Biennial Lyon, Material Conceptualism at Anaant and Zoo Gallery, Berlin; Pacific Standard Time, LAXART, 2012, Los Angeles; Perform Now! Los Angeles 2010;Registered, White Columns, New York, 2009; Bread and Roses 101, University of Trash, Sculpture Center, New York, 2009. She received an MA in Fine Arts from Central Saint Martins School of Art, London (UK) in 2005 after obtaining a MA in Architecture from ESARQ, Barcelona in 2002. She was a co-founder of the temporary art project EXHIBITION, NY (2009). Her third artist’s bookThe Absence of Work has been recently released, published by Platform3 Munich-Edition Taube, Berlin.

Xinan (Helen) Ran is an emerging artist currently living in Brooklyn, New York. She is an incoming MFA Painting candidate for Hunter College New York, and received her BFA from Pratt Institute '17. She is an Ox-Bow 2016 Summer Fellow, and a proud alumni of Pearson College UWC '13. Apart from the studio art practice, Xinan aspire to become a set designer for new theaters. Past collaborations include Shout Alone Theater Company’s Chasing Light (2015) and works produced by Castillo Theater, All Stars Project. 

Larissa Gilbert is an artist and educator based in Los Angeles, CA. She received her BFA from the Cooper Union in New York City where she focused on the intersection of video, performance, and sculpture. Larissa’s work researches the effects that cinema and media has on history, culture, and group formations in the United States. Recently, she has exhibited and screened her work at the Nakanojo Biennial in Japan, Anthology Film Archives, and the historic Cooper Union Great Hall.

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Screening: Elizabeth Stephens’ and Annie Sprinkle’s Good Bye Gauley Mountain: An Eco-Sexual Love Story (2013)
Nov
1
6:30 PM18:30

Screening: Elizabeth Stephens’ and Annie Sprinkle’s Good Bye Gauley Mountain: An Eco-Sexual Love Story (2013)

 Image courtesy of Elizabeth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle

Image courtesy of Elizabeth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle

Screening: Elizabeth Stephens’ and Annie Sprinkle’s Good Bye Gauley Mountain: An Eco-Sexual Love Story (2013)
Thursday, November 1, 2018
6:30 – 8:00 PM

A viewing of Elizabeth Stephens’ and Annie Sprinkle’s film Goodbye Gauley Mountain: An Ecosexual Love Story. The screening will be accompanied by organic popcorn and ice-cold limeade. A post-film Q&A with Lillian Ball and Brooke Singer will follow, with an open discussion on current ecological as well as gender-related issues.

Goodbye Gauley Mountain: An Ecosexual Love Story is an autobiographical documentary depicting the “pollen-amorous” love affair between artist-couple Beth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle, and the biodiverse Appalachian Mountains. This documentary follows Stephens and Sprinkle on a journey home to Beth’s native West Virginia, to talk to rural community members, environmental activists, family and friends in order to speak out against mountain top removal (MTR) mining practices, which are destroying the forests, towns, and people they love. The subject of this film is as relevant today as it was when it was made in 2013, as current U.S. presidential orders have been dismantling major laws respecting the Earth.

PARTICIPANTS

Lillian Ball is an artist and environmental activist working in New York. Water imagery is a constant, focusing on environmental concerns. A multidisciplinary background in anthropology, ethnographic film, and sculpture inform her work. She exhibits internationally and has received numerous awards including two New York State Foundation for the Arts grants, a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship in Visual Arts, and a National Endowment for the Arts grant.

Brooke Singer engages technoscience as an artist, educator, nonspecialist and collaborator. Her work lives “on” and “off” line in the form of websites, workshops, photographs, maps, installations, public art and performances that often involves participation in pursuit of social change. She is Associate Professor of New Media at Purchase College, State University of New York, a former fellow at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center (2010-11), co-founder of the art, technology and activist group Preemptive Media (2002-2008) and co-founder of La Casita Verde (2013-). She is in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, Microsoft and Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond Learsy.

This event takes place in conjunction with As Far as the Heart Can See (September 21 – November 17, 2018).

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The Non-Professional Development Workshop
Nov
10
2:00 PM14:00

The Non-Professional Development Workshop

The Non-Professional Development Workshop
In partnership with the Artists Alliance Inc. (AAI)
Saturday, November 10, 2018
2:00 – 5:00 PM

This workshop brings together artists from EFA Project Space, Artists Alliance Inc., and other organizations for a conversation on the topic of the over-professionalization of the arts.

Professional development programs endeavor to give artists the practical tools to survive in the art world in this time of rising expectations, and education and living costs.  This training, with its emphasis on “how to emerge, how to network and build your name” is often focused on art as a means of production for the market, instead of art as a form of creative expression.  In its well-intentioned mentoring on strategic planning for the career track, it --purposefully or not-- sets expectations about what constitutes professional success, constraining the possibilities for making art and being an artist. The Anti-Professional Development Workshop seeks to provide alternative approaches, reflections and humor on the evolving realities of the creative person and extend the definition of what it means to be an artist in the 21st century. This event will be presented in collaboration with Artist Alliance Inc.

Founded in 1999, Artists Alliance Inc. (AAI) is an artist and curator-centered 501c3 non-profit organization committed to supporting emerging and underrepresented contemporary artists. Through innovative programming, experimentation and collaboration, AAI serves as a resource and forum to engage the community of the Lower East Side.

PARTICIPANTS

Bill Carroll is director of the Studio Program at EFA.

Mary Ting is a visual artist working in installation, drawing, sculpture, and community projects that examine cultural history, grief and nature.  Her varied work reflects on our stories - our devotions and desperations. Recent solo exhibitions in the NYC area include Lambent Foundation, Dean Project, metaphor contemporary art, and Kentler International Drawing Space and at the Wake Forest University, North Carolina.   International group shows include: Social Justice and the Right to be Human at the Athens School of Fine Art, Greece; 2011 Art Stays 9 ,Slovenia; 2009 International Women’s Biennale, Incheon, Korea; and the Sofia Paper Biennial, Bulgaria. A two-time recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship,  2016 Joan Mitchell Center New Orleans Residency, 2016 Lower Manhattan Cultural Council  In Process Residency, 2010 Gottlieb Foundation individual grant, Lambent Fellowship,  Pollack Krasner Foundation among others.  Residencies include MacDowell Colony, Lower Eastside Printshop Special Editions, Dieu Donne Papermill Workspace, and others. Mary Ting currently teaches at CUNY John Jay College in the studio art department and the Sustainability and the Environmental Justice Program.  She is also  faculty at Transart Institute MFA Program, New York/Berlin.  Mary is an avid gardener certified master composter and citizen She is also a frequent lecturer, independent curator and writer.  The crazed ravaging of the earth, the displacement of vulnerable communities and pending extinctions is what keeps her up at night and also awakens her in the morning. She is currently researching and writing about Chinese Modern History, Trauma, and the Lust for Endangered Species Parts.  Mary has a bachelors degree from Parsons School of Design, NYC, a diploma from the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing in Chinese folk art studies, and a masters degree from the Vermont School of Fine Art. 

Jodi Waynberg is Executive Director at Artists Alliance Inc.

Martha Wilson is a pioneering feminist artist and gallery director, who over the past four decades created innovative photographic and video works that explore her female subjectivity through role-playing, costume transformations, and “invasions” of other people’s personae. She began making these videos and photo/text works in the early 1970s while in Halifax in Nova Scotia, and further developed her performative and video-based practice after moving in 1974 to New York City, embarking on a long career that would see her gain attention across the U.S. for her provocative appearances and works. In 1976 she also founded and continues to direct Franklin Furnace, an artist-run space that champions the exploration, promotion and preservation of artists’ books, installation art, video, onliine and performance art, further challenging institutional norms, the roles artists play within society, and expectations about what constitutes acceptable art mediums.

This event takes place in conjunction with As Far as the Heart Can See (September 21 – November 17, 2018).

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In Perpetuity: Tenants Meeting
Jul
13
6:13 PM18:13

In Perpetuity: Tenants Meeting

 Image: courtesy of Wong Kit Yi

Image: courtesy of Wong Kit Yi

In Perpetuity: Tenants Meeting
Friday, July 13, 2018
6:13 - 9:30 PM


Join us for a a public conversation-wanting-to-be-podcast hosted by Wong Kit Yi and Sarah Demeuse, followed by a closing reception for Seven Senses.

Wong's film "Uploading Consciousness to a Lotus Root" (2018) is the common ground for set of questions exploring the conundrum of "How long is forever?" Seeking answers from genetics, biotechnology, legal contracts, and people like you, Wong Kit Yi and Sarah Demeuse will weave their findings into a living dispersed organism, reminiscent of a magic mushroom.

We begin at 6:13 PM sharp. Please make sure your phones are charged and minds are expandable!

The evening continues with a closing reception for the SHIFT Residency Exhibition, Seven Senses, on view from June 15 - July 14, 2018.

Gallery Hours: Wednesday - Saturday, 12 - 6 PM

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Cut Tongue Heart Speak with Natalie Diaz and Tania Willard
May
3
6:00 PM18:00

Cut Tongue Heart Speak with Natalie Diaz and Tania Willard

 Tania Willard,  Only Available Light , from the series  Only Available Light , 2016. Archival film (Harlan I. Smith,  The Shuswap Indians of British Columbia , 1928), projector, selenite crystals and photons. Film 8:44. Original composition by Leela Gilday. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Tania Willard, Only Available Light, from the series Only Available Light, 2016. Archival film (Harlan I. Smith, The Shuswap Indians of British Columbia, 1928), projector, selenite crystals and photons. Film 8:44. Original composition by Leela Gilday. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Cut Tongue Heart Speak with Natalie Diaz and Tania Willard
In partnership with Endangered Language Alliance
Thursday, May 3, 2018
6 - 7:30 PM

Please RSVP to projectspace@efanyc.org.


Language revitalization and reclamation is central to the practices of a generation of Native Artists moving between urban and rural communities. Artist Tania Willard and poet Natalie Diaz will have a public discussion about the motivation and struggles behind learning to speak Secwepémcstin (Secwépemculecw/Interior Salish, British Columbia, Canada) and Mojave (Arizona, USA) respectively—learning the languages of their parents as a second language and as a subject that informs their different disciplines. The discussion will focus on the value of inherent meaning, and knowledge contained in distinct languages. Presented in partnership with Endangered Languages Alliance (Brooklyn), an organization providing opportunities for education and outreach around the preservation of the estimated 800 languages spoken in New York.

PARTICIPANTS

Tania Willard is from the Secwépemc Nation, Interior British Columbia. She works within the shifting ideas of contemporary and traditional as it relates to Indigenous cultural arts and production. Her curatorial projects include Beat Nation: Art Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture, The Vancouver Art Gallery with Kathleen Ritter, Unceded Territories: Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun at the Museum of Anthropology with Karen Duffek, Nanitch: Historical BC photography, and Landmarks2017/Repéres2017. Her art practice centres around BUSH gallery, a site of land-based experimental and conceptual Indigenous art futurity.

Natalie Diaz was born and raised in the Fort Mojave Indian Village in Needles, California, on the banks of the Colorado River. She is Mojave and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Tribe. Her first poetry collection, When My Brother Was an Aztec, was published by Copper Canyon Press in 2012. She is a Lannan Literary Fellow and a Native Arts Council Foundation Artist Fellow. She was awarded a Bread Loaf Fellowship, the Holmes National Poetry Prize, a Hodder Fellowship, and a PEN/Civitella Ranieri Foundation Residency, as well as being awarded a US Artists Ford Fellowship. Diaz teaches at the Arizona State University Creative Writing MFA program. She splits her time between the east coast and Mohave Valley, Arizona, where she works to revitalize the Mojave language.

COMMUNITY PARTNER

The Endangered Language Alliance (ELA)
is an independent non-profit based in New York City and the only organization in the world focused on the immense linguistic diversity of urban areas. Many of the New York area’s estimated 800 languages are highly endangered; for many, New York is a major center. ELA documents and describes underdescribed and endangered languages, educating a larger public and collaborating with communities.

This event takes place in conjunction with #callresponse (March 23 - May 5, 2018).

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Apr
28
4:00 PM16:00

Feet on The Ground Performance

Feet on the Ground.gif

Saturday, April 28, 2018
4 - 6 PM

Please RSVP to projectspace@efanyc.org.

Feet on the Ground is a participatory group performance and art collaboration that asks, 'how do we decolonize ourselves?' Featuring a custom-made toolbox containing items designed by artists Esther Neff, IV Castellanos, and Maria Hupfield, the artists invite the audience to participate in empowering the collaborative and considerate by making new items for the toolbox using materials provided onsite. Conducted as an ongoing series of performances, each one informing the next, this project brings together survival strategies of politically-minded performance artists.

The artists will introduce new items, and collaborate in the space with visitors and invited guests during regular gallery hours, leading up to this two-hour performance. For EFA's iteration of #callresponse, the artists have created a custom bookshelf and triangular bench-style pedestal. Unlike the military term “boots on the ground” the title Feet on The Ground is one where direct community interaction and liberation of the undressed foot takes priority over combat. Previous iterations of this project were performed in New York at MAWA Gallery, Bullet Space, and Emily Carr University of Arts and Design (Vancouver, Canada).

PARTICIPANTS

Maria Hupfield
is martin clan, Anishinaabe and a member of Wasauksing First Nation, Ontario, based in Brooklyn NY. Her solo traveling exhibition The One Who Keeps on Giving premiered at The Power Plant in 2017 and was featured in Art in America. She is the first Indigenous Artist Resident at ISCP 2018, has performed and exhibited at Site Santa Fe Biennale 2016 and is a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptures Award. She is a member of Social Health Performance Club and co-owns Native Art Department International with artist Jason Lujan.

IV Castellanos is a trans Bolivian-American sculptor and abstract performance artist based in Brooklyn, NY. They were a 2017 AIR Chez Bushwick resident with collaborator Amanda Hunt and Gibney Work Up 2017. IV is Founder of the IV Soldiers Gallery 2014, Founder of the Feminist Art Group 2015 in collaboration with Esther Neff and is a regular performing member of the Social Health Performance Club.

Esther Neff is an artist, organizer, and independent theorist whose work deals with forms-of-life, mentalities, social gathering, and ways-of-seeing (theories and beliefs). She is the founder of Panoply Performance Laboratory (PPL), a lab site in Brooklyn, a performance-making collective, and thinktank. Neff’s performance work (solo and as/with PPL) has been performed at Momenta Art, The Kitchen, The New Museum, Dixon Place, Bronx Museum, 14 Wall Street (NYC) as part of festivals in Chicago, Berlin, Copenhagen, and elsewhere across the USA and around the world. She is also the instigator of Brooklyn International Performance Art Foundation (BIPAF), PERFORMANCY FORUM, and is currently co-opening a life-art lab in St, Louis called MARSH (Materializing and Activating Radical Social Habitus) with her mother.

This event takes place in conjunction with #callresponse (March 23 - May 5, 2018).

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Honoring Our Sisters Roundtable
Mar
28
6:00 PM18:00

Honoring Our Sisters Roundtable

 Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Honoring Our Sisters Roundtable
Presented in partnership with AMERINDA
Wednesday, March 28, 2018
6 - 8:30 PM


Please RSVP to projectspace@efanyc.org.

Honoring Our Sisters Roundtable is led by Indigenous women in conversation with guest respondents working at the intersection of art, advocacy and radical solidarity building with Indigenous peoples. Work from the exhibit will serve as a point of departure for conversation on ethical collaboration, recentering institutional power, and critical accountability to Indigenous Nations leading the movement for resurgence, decolonization, and reclamation of their homelands in North America. Participants include: Audra Simpson, Professor Anthropology Columbia University, Crystal Migwans, PhD Native Art History, Columbia University, Tarah Hogue, Senior Curatorial Fellow, Indigenous Art, Vancouver Art Gallery, with guest respondants Rocio Aranda-Alvarado, Senior Curator El Museo del Barrio, Jaskiran Dhillon, Assistant Professor of Global Studies and Anthropology, The New School, Carin Kuoni, Director/Chief Curator, Vera List Center for Arts and Politics, The New School, and Melissa Iakowi:he'ne' Oakes, Social Advocate and Organizer, American Indian Community House,. Moderator: Maria Hupfield, Artist.

PARTICIPANTS

Audra Simpson is Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. She is the author of Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States (Duke University Press, 2014), winner of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association’s Best First Book in Native American and Indigenous Studies Prize, the Laura Romero Prize from the American Studies Association as well as the Sharon Stephens Prize from the American Ethnological Society (2015). She is co-editor of Theorizing Native Studies (Duke University Press, 2014). She has articles in Theory & Event, Cultural Anthropology, American Quarterly, Junctures, Law and Contemporary Problems and Wicazo Sa Review. In 2010 she won Columbia University’s School for General Studies “Excellence in Teaching Award.” She is a Kahnawake Mohawk.

Crystal Migwans is an Anishinaabekwe of Wikwemikong Unceded First Nation, and the place she calls home is the Mahzenahzing (Painted) River. A multimedia artist by training, Crystal's path turned to research and community arts during her time as Curatorial Assistant at the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation in M'Chigeeng, Canada. She is currently in the Art History PhD program at Columbia University in New York, where she look for echoes of an Anishinaabe artistic legacy in the archives of the colonial metropolis.

Tarah Hogue is a curator and writer of Métis and Dutch Canadian ancestry. She is the inaugural Senior Curatorial Fellow, Indigenous Art at the Vancouver Art Gallery and was the 2016 Audain Aboriginal Curatorial Fellow at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. Hogue was curator in residence with grunt gallery between 2014-2017, and has curated exhibitions at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Or Gallery, and SFU Gallery.

Rocío Aranda-Alvarado was born in Santiago de Chile. She is the Senior Curator at El Museo del Barrio in New York City, where she is working La Bienal 2018 El Museo’s biennial of emerging artists and A Brief History of (Some) Things, an exhibition exploring the persistence of Mesoamerican and Indigenous Caribbean imagery in contemporary art. She organized Presente! The Young Lords in New York, and Antonio Lopez: Future Funk Fashion, both nominated among the best exhibitions for 2015 and 2016 by numerous publications. Aranda-Alvarado teachers Contemporary U.S. Latinx Art, Modern and Contemporary Latin American art at The City College of New York. Publications include catalogue essays for the Museum of Modern Art, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (National Gallery of Art, Washington DC), and El Museo del Barrio, Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art, Art Nexus, Review, the journal of the Americas Society, NYFA Quarterly, BOMB and American Art.

Jaskiran Dhillon is a first generation academic and organizer who grew up on Treaty Six Cree/Métis Territory in Saskatchewan, and an Assistant Professor of Global Studies/ Anthropology, The New School New York. Her first book Prairie Rising: Indigenous Youth, Decolonization, and the Politics of Intervention (2017), provides a critical account of settler state violence in the lives of Indigenous Youth.

Carin Kuoni (M.A. University of Zurich; B.A. Sorbonne) is director/chief curator of the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School and teaches at The New School. A founding member of the artists' collective REPOhistory, Kuoni has curated and co-curated numerous transdisciplinary exhibitions on issues such as contemporary Native American identity and colonial, 19th-century portraiture; democratic, participatory processes; artistic and social networks; new notions of transient and temporary spaces; or agency. Kuoni is the recipient of a 2014 Andy Warhol Foundation Curatorial Fellowship, directed SITAC XII: Arte, justamente in Mexico City in 2015, and is a Travel Companion for the 57th Carnegie International in 2018.

Melissa Iakowi:he'ne' Oakes is a Mohawk woman, Snipe Clan. She resides in Akwesasne Mohawk Territory, where she was born and raised, and New York City. She has trained in northern and southern tribal art, fashion, business, politics, leadership and studied in Montréal, NYC, Shanghai, Beijing, and Hong Kong. At an early age, she experienced Canadian Army tanks in her backyard, blockades on her street, and no school due to military occupation on her reservation territory for months at a time. Activism is a central part of Iakowi:he'ne' life experience from the Oka Crisis, to Idle No More, the Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign, and NoDAPL to the Mohawk Warrior Society. 

Maria Hupfield is martin clan, Anishinaabe and a member of Wasauksing First Nation, Ontario, based in Brooklyn NY. Her solo traveling exhibition The One Who Keeps on Giving premiered at The Power Plant in 2017 and was featured in Art in America. She is the first Indigenous Artist Resident at ISCP 2018, has performed and exhibited at Site Santa Fe Biennale 2016 and is a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptures Award. She is a member of Social Health Performance Club and co-owns Native Art Department International with artist Jason Lujan.

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Established in 1987, American Indian Artists Inc. (AMERINDA) is a community-based multi-arts organization that works to empower Native Americans and foster intercultural understanding of Native culture. Located in New York, AMERINDA is the only Native American multi-arts organization of its kind in the U.S., and has been widely recognized for its artistic and cultural integrity.  In addition to curated exhibitions of contemporary art, AMERINDA’s new non-fiction volume, No Reservation: New York Contemporary Native American Art Movement, distributed by D.A.P., reveals a previously hidden history of contemporary Native American art in New York City. The publication marks the first time that a diverse group of Native visual and performing artists, filmmakers and writers has been defined and given a name.  The encounter of Native practices and influences with mainstream art in New York City, created a community in which relationship between art and indigenous sensibility was recognized and nurtured. The Movement is the only such movement of its kin outside of Santa Fe, NM and and important part of American history.

This event takes place in conjunction with #callresponse (March 23 - May 5, 2018).

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Ursula Johnson, Ke’tapekiaq Ma’qimikew: The Land Sings with Jennifer Kreisberg and Laura Ortman
Mar
25
1:00 PM13:00

Ursula Johnson, Ke’tapekiaq Ma’qimikew: The Land Sings with Jennifer Kreisberg and Laura Ortman

Ursula Johnson.jpg

Sunday, March 25, 2018
1 - 3 PM
The High Line - 14th Street Passage
(Between W. 13 & W. 14)
Rain location: EFA Project Space

Please RSVP to projectspace@efanyc.org.


Ursula Johnson invites Tuscarora singer Jennifer Kreisberg and Brooklyn-based violinist Laura Ortman to collaborate and create a song from and for the land. Ke’tapekiaq Ma’qimikew: The Land Sings is a series of ongoing performances or “visitations” inspired by Indigenous song lines—singing the land—as a navigational and relational practice. For this iteration Johnson and Ortman will use duration performance, song, violin and drum to enact their relations and responsibility to the land and waters of Lenapehoking / New York. Sited on The High Line, an elevated greenway built on a repurposed rail line, the New York visitation highlights the way humans have impacted the landscape, displacing the voices of Indigenous peoples.

PARTICIPANTS

Ursula Johnson is the winner of the 2017 Sobey Art Award. She is an interdisciplinary artist and an enrolled member of the Eskasoni First Nation Mi’kmaq Community on Cape Breton Island based out of Dartmouth NS. Active in Mi’kmaw language revitalization and descendent from a long line of esteemed basketmakers, her nationally touring solo show Mi'kwite'tmn (Do You Remember) considers the consumption of traditional knowledge within colonial institutions. Johnson was awarded The Hnatyshyn Foundation Reveal Indigenous Art Award 2017.

Jennifer Kriesberg (Tuscarora, North Carolina) comes from four generations of Seven Singing Sisters through the maternal line. Kreisberg opened the Women’s March in Washington DC. She is an accomplished singer, composer, producer, teacher, activist and member of the critically acclaimed Native women's trio Ulali. Frequently called upon to guest lecture and conduct vocal workshops throughout the United States and Canada, Kreisberg has worked in film and television and toured extensively internationally. Performance venues include Carnegie Hall, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, The Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian, The Olympics, and elsewhere. 

An inquisitive and exquisite violinist, Laura Ortman is versed in Apache violin, piano, electric guitar, keyboards, and pedal steel guitar, often sings through a megaphone, and is a producer of capacious field recordings. She has performed at The Whitney Museum of American Art and The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal, and the Centre Pompidou, Paris, among countless venues in the US, Canada, and Europe. Ortman founded the Coast Orchestra in 2008, an all-Native American orchestral ensemble performing a live soundtrack to Edward Curtis’s film In the Land of the Head Hunters (1914), the first silent feature film to star an all-Native American cast. She is the recipient of the Jerome Foundation Fellowship 2017, Art Matters 2016, Native Arts and Cultural Foundation Fellowship 2016, Museum of Contemporary Native Arts Social Engagement Resident 2015 and the 2014/15 Rauschenberg Residency.

This event takes place in conjunction with #callresponse (March 23 - May 5, 2018).

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#callresponse Walkthrough and Opening Reception with Nishnaabekweg Negamond
Mar
23
6:00 PM18:00

#callresponse Walkthrough and Opening Reception with Nishnaabekweg Negamond

 Laakkuluk Williamson-Bathory,  Timiga nunalu, sikulu  (My body, the land and the ice), 2016. Photo: Jamie Griffiths.

Laakkuluk Williamson-Bathory, Timiga nunalu, sikulu (My body, the land and the ice), 2016. Photo: Jamie Griffiths.

Friday, March 23, 6 - 8 PM
6:00 - 8:30 PM: Opening Reception
6:00 - 6:30 PM: Curatorial Walkthrough

Please RSVP to projectspace@efanyc.org.


Join visiting artists and co-organizers of #callresponse promptly at 6:00 PM for a walkthrough of the exhibition, followed by the opening reception. Nishnaabekweg Negamond is an Anishinaabe women’s handdrumming group that meets regularly in Brooklyn NY.

PARTICIPANTS

Tarah Hogue is a curator and writer of Métis and Dutch Canadian ancestry. She is the inaugural Senior Curatorial Fellow, Indigenous Art at the Vancouver Art Gallery and was the 2016 Audain Aboriginal Curatorial Fellow at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. Hogue was curator in residence with grunt gallery between 2014-2017, and has curated exhibitions at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Or Gallery, and SFU Gallery.

Maria Hupfield is martin clan, Anishinaabe and a member of Wasauksing First Nation, Ontario, based in Brooklyn NY. Her solo traveling exhibition The One Who Keeps on Giving premiered at The Power Plant in 2017 and was featured in Art in America. She is the first Indigenous Artist Resident at ISCP 2018, has performed and exhibited at Site Santa Fe Biennale 2016 and is a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptures Award. She is a member of Social Health Performance Club and co-owns Native Art Department International with artist Jason Lujan.

Tania Willard is from the Secwe̓pemc Nation, Interior British Columbia. She works within the shifting ideas of contemporary and traditional as it relates to Indigenous cultural arts and production. Her curatorial projects include Beat Nation: Art Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture, The Vancouver Art Gallery with Kathleen Ritter, Unceded Territories: Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun at the Museum of Anthropology with Karen Duffek, Nanitch: Historical BC photography, and Landmarks2017/Repéres2017. Her art practice centres around BUSH gallery, a site of land-based experimental and conceptual Indigenous art futurity.

Nishnaabekwewag Negamonid is a three-member Anishinaabe women’s hand drumming group based in Brooklyn, NY. They are committed to language and cultural revitalization, using song to disrupt colonial spaces and speak to prior, persisting Indigenous presences. The group was born as part of an Anti-Columbus Day action in the American Museum of Natural History in 2016 and 2017.

This event takes place in conjunction with #callresponse (March 23 - May 5, 2018).

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Closing reception with performance by Rebirth Garments
Mar
9
6:00 PM18:00

Closing reception with performance by Rebirth Garments

OUTFIT, Fawn Krieger, 2016.gif

Friday March 9th, 6 pm - 9 pm
Free and open to the public.

Join us for a closing event and prompt for the future with a performance by Rebirth Garments.

ACCESSIBILITY

EFA Project Space is on the 2nd floor of 323 West 39th Street. The building has an ADA wheelchair accessible elevator that provides access to the gallery from the ground floor. There are all-gender single stall bathrooms and an ADA approved bathroom on the 3rd floor. Children are welcome.

Admission to the building does not require an ID, but you will be asked to sign-in. The closest MTA subway station is the Port Authority A, C, E stop which is ADA wheelchair accessible.

Texts and programs are in English. Large format texts can be provided with advance request.

This event is hosted in conjunction with Omega Workshop (January 26 - March 10, 2018). 

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The History, Anatomy and Construction of a Pocket with Michaela Hansen
Mar
3
12:00 PM12:00

The History, Anatomy and Construction of a Pocket with Michaela Hansen

Pocket-Sewing.gif

Saturday, March 3rd, 12 pm - 3 pm
This is a ticketed event. Register here.

In this beginner-level sewing class, designer and historian Michaela Hansen will introduce participants to the hidden (feminist) history of the pocket. The workshop will culminate with the opportunity to add a pocket to an existing pocket-less garment of your choice. Bring your own sewing machine.

This event is hosted in conjunction with Omega Workshop (January 26 - March 10, 2018). 

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Worker Co-operative Principles and Pricing Structures with friends of light
Feb
17
12:00 PM12:00

Worker Co-operative Principles and Pricing Structures with friends of light

Worker Coop.jpeg

Satuday, February 17th, 12 - 4 pm
Free event. Register here.

Worker cooperative ‘friends of light’ invites you to join them in thinking through the valuation of skilled labor involved in the production of fashion and textiles. In this 4-hour workshop, ‘friends of light’ will present their business and pricing structure, developed during a transformative 6-month course at the Green Worker Cooperative Academy in Bronx, NY in an effort to integrate their values, activities, and economic needs. Through reflection and discussion, participants will work to establish a realistic price point for their products or services by evaluating the cost structure of their current practice or business in relation to their values and economic needs. All are welcome, with a special invitation to artists, designers, and makers engaged in the production of fashion or textiles.

This event is hosted in conjunction with Omega Workshop (January 26 - March 10, 2018). 

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Unpick the Fashion System / Collage a Collection with Ruby Hoette
Feb
16
10:00 AM10:00

Unpick the Fashion System / Collage a Collection with Ruby Hoette

Ruby_Hoette_unpicking.jpg

Saturday, February 16th, 10 am - 4 pm
Free event. Register here.

During this workshop you will dissect a garment to reveal the possibilities hidden in its materials and construction. Using the resulting garment elements we will collectively collage a new fashion collection. Bring your own garment.

This event is hosted in conjunction with Omega Workshop (January 26 - March 10, 2018). 

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Make-your-own-JUMPSUIT with the Rational Dress Society
Feb
10
10:00 AM10:00

Make-your-own-JUMPSUIT with the Rational Dress Society

Make Your Own JUMPSUIT.png

Saturday, February 10th - Sunday, February 11th, 10 am – 4 pm
This is a ticketed event. Register here.


In this two-day workshop, learn to sew your own ungendered multiuse monogarment with the Rational Dress Society! After the workshop, we will throw away all of our clothes. Participants should bring their own sewing machine, 3 - 4 yards of nonstretch fabric, matching thread, and scissors.

This event is hosted in conjunction with Omega Workshop (January 26 - March 10, 2018).

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Fashion and Democracy
Feb
8
6:00 PM18:00

Fashion and Democracy

Gallery 400-Chances Dances - PLATFORMS -WERQ - Embodying Queer Spirit-4906-WEB.jpg

Thursday, February 8th, 6 - 9 pm
Free event. Register here.


Join the Rational Dress Society, Political Science professor Joshua I. Miller, designer and theorist Otto von Busch, designer and garment activist Frau Fiber and Sky Cubacub of Rebirth Garments to discuss the relationship between fashion and social hierarchy. We propose counter-fashion as a democratic alternative to the current fashion system.

This event is hosted in conjunction with Omega Workshop (January 26 - March 10, 2018).

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Copyright, Trademark and Sumptuary Law Panel Discussion
Feb
7
6:00 PM18:00

Copyright, Trademark and Sumptuary Law Panel Discussion

OUTFIT, Fawn Krieger, 2016.gif

Wednesday, February 7th, 6 - 8 pm
Free event. RSVP to projectspace@efanyc.org.

Join designer Abigail Glaum-Lathbury, artist Elaine Byrne, representatives Amanda Levendowski and Evelina Yarmit of the Technology Law & Policy Clinic at NYU, and Professor of Law Barton Beebe to discuss the relationship between the history of sumptuary law (laws that attempted to restrict dress in order to maintain social control) and the similar function of contemporary copyright protections.

This event is hosted in conjunction with Omega Workshop (January 26 - March 10, 2018).

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Kamiko / Japanese Paper Clothes with Daphne Mohajer va Pesaran
Feb
3
12:00 PM12:00

Kamiko / Japanese Paper Clothes with Daphne Mohajer va Pesaran

Paper Clothes.jpg

Saturday, February 3rd, 12 – 3 PM
This event is free. Register here.

Practice the Japanese art of kamiko (clothes made from handmade washi paper), clothes made from handmade paper, with Tokyo-based designer and researcher Daphne Mohajer Va Pesaran. In this workshop we will learn how paper can be made into a textile using traditional Japanese methods.  

This event is hosted in conjunction with Omega Workshop (January 26 - March 10, 2018). 

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Psychoanalysis with Jamieson Webster
Jan
5
6:30 PM18:30

Psychoanalysis with Jamieson Webster

 Image:  Progeny!  installation view of Julian Hoeber, "Pink Tube," 2016 (courtesy of Blum & Poe), and Ditta Baron Hoeber, "8 Minutes 52 Seconds (from the series Proximity)," 2013. Photography: Sebastian Bach. 

Image: Progeny! installation view of Julian Hoeber, "Pink Tube," 2016 (courtesy of Blum & Poe), and Ditta Baron Hoeber, "8 Minutes 52 Seconds (from the series Proximity)," 2013. Photography: Sebastian Bach. 

Informed by therapeutic approaches, EFA Project Space's current exhibition, Progeny!, pairs a group of contemporary artists with their artist-parents to explore relationships of influence, genetics, and interdependence within artistic families. As the exhibition draws to a close, the curators have decided to bring in a professional. Psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster will walk through the exhibition and discuss the works on view with curators David Levine, Michelle Levy, and some of the participating artists.

This event is free and open to the public.

BIO

Jamieson Webster is a psychoanalyst  in New York. She has written for Artforum, Apology, Cabinet, The Guardian, Playboy, Spike, and The New York Times. Author of The Life and Death of Psychoanalysis (Karnac, 2011) and Stay! Illusion, with Simon Critchley (Pantheon, 2013), she is currently working on The Cambridge Introduction to Jacques Lacan, with Marcus Coelen, and a new book, Conversion Disorder (Columbia, 2018).

This event takes place in conjunction with Progeny!, on view through January 6, 2018. 

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"Near & Dear" and Material Culture: Artists as Researchers
Oct
25
7:00 PM19:00

"Near & Dear" and Material Culture: Artists as Researchers

 Image: Brian Zegeer,  The Golden Hour  (detail), 2017. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Anqi Peng

Image: Brian Zegeer, The Golden Hour (detail), 2017. Courtesy of the artist.
Photo: Anqi Peng


"Near & Dear" and Material Culture: Artists as Researchers

A Conversation with Glenn Adamson and Sheila Pepe

Wednesday, October 25, 7 PM

Using the exhibition Near & Dear as a starting point, Glenn Adamson and Sheila Pepe discuss the amorous connections artists make with signifying materials and objects. Participating artists Jennifer Paige Cohen, Rachel Stern and Brian Zegeer will also take part in the conversation.

PARTICIPANT BIOS 

Glenn Adamson is a curator, writer and historian based in Brooklyn, who works across the fields of design, craft and contemporary art. Currently Senior Scholar at the Yale Center for British Art, and Editor-at-Large of The Magazine Antiques, he has previously been Director of the Museum of Arts and Design, New York; Head of Research at the V&A; and Curator at the Chipstone Foundation in Milwaukee. His publications include Art in the Making (2016, co-authored with Julia Bryan Wilson); Invention of Craft (2013); Postmodernism: Style and Subversion (2011); The Craft Reader (2010); and Thinking Through Craft (2007). His next book, Fewer Better Things, will be published by Bloomsbury in August 2018.

Sheila Pepe is a cross-disciplinary artist employing conceptualism, surrealism, and craft to address feminist and class issues. Solo exhibitions include the Smith College Museum of Art and Weatherspoon Art Museum. Group exhibitions include the first "Greater New York” (PS1/MoMA); "Hand + Made: The Performative Impulse in Art & Craft," Contemporary Art Museum Houston; "Queer Threads." Leslie Lohman Museum of Lesbian and Gay Art as well as commissions for the 8th Shenzhen Sculpture Biennale, and “Artisterium," Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia.“Hot Mess Formalism,” a mid-career survey, with a book distributed by Prestel, is currently on view at the Phoenix Art Museum. The show will travel to the Everson Museum and Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts in 2018.

This event takes place in conjunction with Near & Dear (September 15 - October 28, 2017).

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An Anarchy: Reading in Pavilion for Red Emma
Oct
20
7:00 PM19:00

An Anarchy: Reading in Pavilion for Red Emma

 Image: Paul Legault and Joseph Kaplan

Image: Paul Legault and Joseph Kaplan

An Anarchy: Reading in "Pavilion for Red Emma"

Friday, October 19, 7 - 8 PM

Emma Goldman was a radical anarchist and social revolutionary leading international movements during the first half of the 20th century. For Near & Dear, artist Rachel Stern created Pavilion for Red Emma as a memorial installation to reflect on Goldman's life and ideas. Stern focuses on Goldman’s belief in beauty as an essential tool for revolution. Goldman cherished fresh flowers and opera, practiced free love, and was captivated by the poetry of Walt Whitman. Paul Legault is a poet whose work often plays with the concept of translation. He will read his translations of Walt Whitman’s poetry (some of which are included in the installation itself) alongside the original texts. Rachel Stern will read selections from Goldman’s autobiography Living My Life.

PARTICIPANT BIOS

Paul Legault is the author of The Madeleine PoemsThe Other PoemsThe Emily Dickinson Reader, and Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror 2. His writing has appeared in Art in AmericaVICE, and The New Museum’s Surround Audience anthology. Paul was born in Canada. He's here.

Rachel Stern (b. 1989, NYC) is a photographer whose work challenges conventions of beauty and promotes escapist, constructivist fantasy. Her work images a world that might be, built out of the world that is. It is a kitsch paradise, a queer-washed history, and an attempt at hope. She received her BFA in Photography and the History of Art and Visual Culture in 2011 from the Rhode Island School of Design, attended Skowhegan in 2014, and graduated from Columbia University in 2016 with an MFA in Visual Arts. Her work has been featured in BOMB, ArtFCity, Hyperallergic, and Matte Magazine.

This event takes place in conjunction with EFA Open Studios and the current exhibition, Near & Dear (September 15 - October 28, 2017).

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The Artist as Culture Producer
Sep
21
6:30 PM18:30

The Artist as Culture Producer

 Image: Zoë Charlton, Fort Mose, 2014 Courtesy of the artist Photography by Greg Staley

Image: Zoë Charlton, Fort Mose, 2014
Courtesy of the artist
Photography by Greg Staley

The Artist as Culture Producer, a conversation with Paddy Johnson, Kat Kiernan, Sharon Louden, Carrie Moyer, and Austin Thomas

Thursday, September 21, 6:30 – 8:30 PM
RSVP via Eventbrite

Paddy Johnson, Austin Thomas, Kat Kiernan and Carrie Moyer join Sharon Louden in a conversation centered around issues from her book, The Artist as Culture Producer: Living and Sustaining a Creative Life, at the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts on September 21st from 6:30-8:30pm. As part of Louden's 94-stop conversation tour, discussion will focus on how contributors in the book have impactful, artistic activities as change agents in their communities. Their first-hand stories in the book show the general public how contemporary artists of the 21st century add to creative economies through their out-of-the-box thinking while also generously contributing to the well-being of others. Although there is a misconception that artists are invisible and hidden, the truth is that they furnish measurable and innovative outcomes at the front lines of education, the non-profit sector, and corporate environments. The event is presented in conjunction with EFA Project Space's exhibition Near & Dear, curated by Carrie Moyer and on view from September 15 - October 28th, 2017. Space is limited. Please RSVP via Eventbrite to reserve your seats: www.eventbrite.com/e/the-artist-as-culture-producer-tickets-37886430333.

This event takes place in conjunction with EFA Project Space's current exhibition, Near & Dear, on view from September 15 - October 28, 2017.

PARTICIPANT BIOS

Paddy Johnson is the Founding Editor of the blog Art F City. In addition to her work at AFC, she has been published in magazines such as New York Magazine, The New York Times and The Economist. Paddy lectures widely about art and the Internet at venues including Yale University, Parsons, Rutgers, South by Southwest, and the Whitney Independent Study Program. In 2008, she became the first blogger to earn a Creative Capital Arts Writers grant from the Creative Capital Foundation. Paddy was nominated for best art critic at The Rob Pruitt Art Awards in 2010 and 2013.  In 2014, she was the subject of a VICE profile for her work as an independent art blogger. Paddy maintains an active presence as a curator as well, most recently curating Geographically Indeterminate Fantasies for Providence College. 

Kat Kiernan is the Editor-in-Chief of the photography magazine Don’t Take Pictures, as well as the Director of Panopticon Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts. Her writings have appeared in numerous publications including Art New EnglandBig, Red, and ShinyFeature Shoot, and most recently in Norm Diamond's monograph What Is Left Behind: Stories From Estate Sales (Daylight Books, 2017). Kat received the Griffin Museum of Photography’s Rising Star Award in 2015 for her contributions to the photographic community. Her photographs have been exhibited across the United States, and Photoboite Agency named her one of 2012’s 30 women photographers under the age of 30 to watch. Kat divides her time between Brooklyn, New York and Boston. She holds a BFA in photography from Lesley University College of Art and Design.

Sharon M. Louden is an artist, educator, advocate for artists, and editor of the Living and Sustaining a Creative Life series of books. She graduated with a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an MFA from Yale University School of Art. Her work has been exhibited in numerous venues including the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, the Drawing Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Weisman Art Museum, National Gallery of Art, Birmingham Museum of Art, Weatherspoon Art Museum and the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art. Louden's work is held in major public and private collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art, National Gallery of Art, Neuberger Museum of Art, Arkansas Arts Center, Yale University Art Gallery, Weatherspoon Art Museum, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among others.

Carrie Moyer is a painter and writer. Most recently, her paintings were included in the 2017 Whitney Biennial. Moyer has been showing her work in the US and Europe for over twenty years; she was the subject of two solo museum exhibitions, “Carrie Moyer: Pirate Jenny,” Tang Museum, Saratoga Springs, NY (2013) and “Carrie Moyer: Interstellar,” Worcester Museum of Art, MA (2012). Between 1991-2008, Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner collaborated as Dyke Action Machine!, a public art project that humorously dissected mainstream advertising through the insertion of lesbian imagery. Moyer’s writing has appeared in Art in America, Artforum, the Brooklyn Rail and various monographs. She is a professor and the Director of MFA Program at Hunter College. Moyer is represented by DC Moore Gallery in New York City.

Austin Thomas is an artist, curator and community builder. Her work has been exhibited at The Drawing Center, Murray Guy, The Sculpture Center, Art in General and at White columns (all in NYC) and internationally in Singapore, Australia, and Hungary and at the Kunsthalle Exnergasse in Vienna. From 2007 to 2014, she directed the influential Pocket Utopia gallery. She is a graduate of NYU and in the Summer of 2016 her permanent public sculpture for a new park in Brooklyn was unveiled. She has also done public commissions for the Public Art Fund and Grinnell College. Thomas's work is featured in the book titled Living and Sustaining a Creative Life: Essays by 40 Working Artists and will also be featured in that book’s sequel The Artist as Culture Producer: Living and Sustaining a Creative Life, which were both edited by Sharon Louden.

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Setting 1880-1920 / Dinner Party
Jul
19
7:00 PM19:00

Setting 1880-1920 / Dinner Party

 Image: courtesy of Liliana Dirks-Goodman

Image: courtesy of Liliana Dirks-Goodman

Setting 1880-1920 / Dinner Party

Wednesday, July 19, 7 - 8:30 PM

This dinner party and lecture performance led by Liliana Dirks-Goodman will focus on the utopian design visions of seven first-wave white feminists who fought for the betterment of womens lives during late 19th and early 20th century North America. 

The dinner party plans to present both domestic and architectural models of what cooperation and interdependence might've looked like through an examination of historical precedents including the Columbian Exposition of 1893. It seeks to continue a conversation around envisioning a model of feminist solidarity that embraces all women without the cooptation of patriarchal, capitalist norms. 

Dinner will be prepared by chef Kristin Worral, who will use recipes from Rumford Kitchen's cookbook. Artistic direction by Mayfield Brooks.

Please note that a ticket is required for entry. Please visit brownpapertickets.com/event/3034205 to purchase your ticket.

This event takes place in conjunction with Past Live (June 22 - July 22, 2017), the SHIFT Residency exhibition. 

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Rubbertime, performance by Zavé Martohardjono & closing reception
May
13
4:00 PM16:00

Rubbertime, performance by Zavé Martohardjono & closing reception

 Zavé Martohardjono,  Rubbertime , 2016. Still from video used in performance. Image taken at The Shandaken Project at Storm King, 2016. 

Zavé Martohardjono, Rubbertime, 2016. Still from video used in performance. Image taken at The Shandaken Project at Storm King, 2016. 

Rubbertime, performance by Zavé Martohardjono & closing reception

Saturday, May 13, 4:00 - 6:00 PM

A queer and trans artist of color, Zavé Martohardjono incorporates mindfulness, Butoh, and releasing techniques into their choreographic practice. These approaches inform the artist’s performance Rubbertime, which will occur at EFA on May 13th to mark the closing of the show. Martohardjono’s related Liminal Bodies workshop shares these improvisational movement practices to help participants heal from socio-political crises. As part of the exhibition’s Warp and Weft of Care satellite programs, the workshop will be offered privately to groups at Project Row Houses and Angela House, and also publically in Houston.

Based on an Indonesian phrase that describes time as malleable, stretchable, and adaptable, Rubbertime is a performance that investigates assimilation, disorientation, and Martohardjono’s fractured relationship to Indonesia as a mixed-race person raised in the West. Martohardjono developed the workshop and performance in response to the dissonance they felt while at an artist residency in a peaceful pastoral setting (the Shandaken Project at Storm King), during the turbulent weeks following the murders of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile. Through improvised choreography that explores the disorientation and reorientation they experienced at that time and place, Martohardjono attempts slowness and investigates what has been erased by colonial frameworks of time within their own body. By exploring decolonization through movement, Rubbertime endeavors to slowly tap into buried and ancestral knowledge and to ultimately undo the damage of assimilation.

BIO

Zavé Martohardjono
(Brooklyn, New York) works across disciplines, making performances, theater, videos, and audience-interactive installations. Their work takes interest in geopolitics, social justice, queer glam, embodied risk-taking, and healing. They often draw from their mixed-race Asian, multi-national, queer, and transgender perspective.

Martohardjono has shown at galleries and theater venues including Aljira Center for Contemporary Art, Bowery Poetry Club, Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance, Bronx River Art Center Gallery, Center for Contemporary Arts in Glasgow, Chashama 540, Dixon Place, La MaMa E.T.C., Grace Exhibition Space, Gibney Dance, Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Mills Gallery at Boston Center for the Arts, Rats 9 Gallery, SOMArts, the Wild Project, and Winslow Garage. Their videos have screened at film festivals in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Montréal, Berlin, London, Amsterdam, Zurich, and Jakarta. They’ve also collaborated with or performed for Mariangela Lopez/Accidental Movement, Ximena Garnica, Vanessa Anspaugh, Lawrence Weiner, devynn emory, J. Dellecave, as well as the collectives Theater Transgression and Into the Neon.

ABOUT THE WARP AND WEFT OF CARE PROGRAM

A satellite programming series, Warp and Weft of Care, takes place between New York and Houston, Texas during the course of the show. It includes public performances as well as closed-door collaborations between artists from the EFA show and groups focused on the health of communities disproportionately facing violence. This includes Angela House’s Whole and Healthy Program (transitional housing and support for women immediately following incarceration), Project Row Houses Young Mothers Residency Program (a residency for low-income single mothers in the historically black neighborhood of Houston’s Third Ward), and Project Row Houses Young Mothers Employment Placement Program (a job training program for low-income single mothers). The aim is to support creative exchange between communities of care in varying contexts, particularly those in red and purple states where poor institutional support has long synced with a prevailing “maverick” ideology of independence and entrepreneurship.

This event takes place in conjunction with Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time: Against Capitalism’s Temporal Bullying (March 31 – May 13, 2017) at EFA Project Space. 

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Survival Creativity, artist talk by Carrie Schneider
May
13
1:30 PM13:30

Survival Creativity, artist talk by Carrie Schneider

 Carrie Schneider and Alex Tu,  The Human Tour,  2013. Photograph by Lillie Monstrum.

Carrie Schneider and Alex Tu, The Human Tour, 2013. Photograph by Lillie Monstrum.

Survival Creativity, artist talk by Carrie Schneider

RESCHEDULED: Saturday, May 13, 1:30 - 3:30 PM

As part of Sick Time Sleepy Time, Crip Time satellite programs, Houston-based artist Carrie Schneider is acting as a field reporter and advisor to the artists participating in Warp and Weft of Care in Texas. She will give an artist’s talk at EFA that draws from her exchange with these artists and own research, which will be followed by a group dialogue.

Warp and Weft of Care’s focus on supporting the health and wellbeing of communities through creative acts runs parallel to Schneider’s ongoing work and current research. As Project Row Houses and University of Houston College of the Arts 2017 Fellow, she is investigating the concept of “survival creativity.” By looking at acts of personal creativity that were made to move through hardships, particularly ones that were scaled up to also produce public catharsis, she suggests how intimate rituals might add to a vocabulary of collective ceremony. Schneider proposes that there are differences between the tactics and urgencies behind creative practices across degrees of hostile environments (such as a far right state like Texas) by citing examples from her work with communities, artists in Houston, and the Warp and Weft of Care programs. Schneider will share strategies of care and creativity formed in the belly of the beast—a city shaped by a deregulated, hyper-capitalist extractive economy in a state dominated by racist and misogynist politics. Attendees will also be asked to share their own examples from difficult contexts in breakout groups.

Schneider’s inquiry into the concept of “survival creativity” aims to amend the adage that “the greatest creativity comes from the most dire circumstances” by pointing out that it overlooks that certain resources—time, systems of support, witnesses—are necessary for this to occur. In Survival Creativity, Schneider will share some of the accounts she’s collected from individuals via interviews and surveys on what it’s taken for them to turn a traumatic experience into a creative expression, and then, to go one step further, for those personal coping strategies to get shared and scaled up into forms of collective relief. From there, she asks how one might transform a process of creating that was formed in order to survive under crisis into one that is driven by pleasure.

BIO

Carrie Schneider (Houston, Texas) is an artist interested in the collapse of moments across time and the ability of people to re-imagine their space. Informed by a family history that tracks intimately with the oil industry, Schneider’s projects often collage architectural and affectual artifacts of boom and bust cycles. Her projects include Hear Our Houston (2011), a collection of public generated audio walking tours in the world’s largest petrochemical hub; Care House (2012), an installation in the house she grew up in that considered the roles of caregiving/caretaking and the bodies of mother/home through the medical-industrial experience of cancer; and Sunblossom Residency (2009-2015), a skill exchange between artists and middle school students who are refugees resettled in Houston.

She is currently Project Row Houses and University of Houston College of the Arts 2017 Fellow. Her work has been featured in Houston by the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Project Row Houses, Diverseworks, Alabama Song, Labotanica, and many other places outside of arts institutions. She has organized numerous public conversations such as Art of Equity for the Rothko Chapel’s Confronting Inequality Symposium and Current Conversations, dialogues between artists and experts in a range of other disciplines, for the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center for the Arts. Her visual work and writing have been featured in Gulf Coast, Temporary Art Review, and Cite Magazine. She earned her BFA in Fine Arts and Culture and Politics from Maryland Institute College of Art and has engaged in a self-constructed MFA program by auditing courses at universities in Houston.  

ABOUT WARP AND WEFT OF CARE PROGRAM

A satellite programming series, Warp and Weft of Care, takes place between New York and Houston, Texas during the course of the show. It includes public performances as well as closed-door collaborations between artists from the EFA show and groups focused on the health of communities disproportionately facing violence. This includes Angela House’s Whole and Healthy Program (transitional housing and support for women immediately following incarceration), Project Row Houses Young Mothers Residency Program (a residency for low-income single mothers in the historically black neighborhood of Houston’s Third Ward), and Project Row Houses Young Mothers Employment Placement Program (a job training program for low-income single mothers). The aim is to support creative exchange between communities of care in varying contexts, particularly those in red and purple states where poor institutional support has long synced with a prevailing “maverick” ideology of independence and entrepreneurship.

This event takes place in conjunction with Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time: Against Capitalism’s Temporal Bullying (March 31 – May 13, 2017) at EFA Project Space. 

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Secret Chakra: Feminist Economics Yoga
May
12
6:30 PM18:30

Secret Chakra: Feminist Economics Yoga

 Image courtesy of Cassie Thornton

Image courtesy of Cassie Thornton

Secret Chakra: Feminist Economics Yoga, a workshop with Cassie Thornton

Friday, May 12, 6:30 - 8:45 PM

Secret Chakra teaches the practice of feminist economics through the format of a yoga class. As part of the Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time exhibition's Warp and Weft of Care programs, this workshop will be offered privately to groups at Project Row Houses and Angela’s House, and also publically at EFA and in Houston.

Based in the idea that energy, security, and prosperity are the products of social solidarity and interdependence (instead of individualism and competition), this workshop asks participants to embody the idea that “my” health, and “my” liberation is bound up in yours. By partnering visualization and embodiment exercises with radical financial literacy, Thornton aims to help people identify and begin to chip away at the seemingly infinite wall of financialization that transforms humans into financial instruments. Financialization is the process wherein profit becomes the motivation behind healthcare, housing, and education and it forces most people in the US to enter into financial debt in order to live. This ubiquitous social form is not natural, eternal, or personal, and it may be lodged in your body somewhere.

Using a combination of deep breathing, yoga, visualization, writing, demolition, and discussion, participants are invited to explore and transform their relationship to money and to the natural value that lives in each person. In order to remove the wall of financialization and move past symptoms that come with surviving under capitalism—alienation, competition, fear and depression—participants will be guided through a process of collectively breaking through an actual wall. We will use crowbars. In addition to demolition, the workshop will include a playful exercise series that stimulates the nervous system and moves energy through the body, alongside conversations about self worth, work, and the value that exists outside of money.

REGISTRATION

Registration required. Please email Meghana Karnik at meghana@efanyc.org and include information about your experience doing yoga and any physical needs you experience that we should take into account for the somatic exercises. Also, please specify if you have a yoga mat that you can bring. Optional response: What would a feminist form of revenge on the economic system would look like?

BIO

Cassie Thornton (Thunderbay, Ontario and Oakland, California)

It is a normal day, everyone is bored, everything good seems impossible. A small white woman has a tantrum in your school’s cafeteria about her for-profit education at a “public institution,” the way her school has colonized the city and her zero-sum future of shallow work, un-payable debt, and constant eviction. It is Cassie Thornton, or one of her agents. Cassie produces perversely hard-hitting social situations that result in unexpected transformations on the streets, in workplaces, and at schools. She stops time to summon up the unknown unknowns that reside in the silences between people, institutions, and economies. Also referred to as the Feminist Economics Department (the FED), Cassie’s work investigates and reveals the impact of governmental and economic systems on public affect, behavior, and unconscious, with a focus on debt and security. She is a feminist economist and artist who uses dance, writing, visual art, hypnosis, experimental research, tours, and radio to reveal debt as a source of solidarity.

ABOUT THE WARP AND WEFT OF CARE PROGRAM

A satellite programming series, Warp and Weft of Care, takes place between New York and Houston, Texas during the course of the show. It includes public performances as well as closed-door collaborations between artists from the EFA show and groups focused on the health of communities disproportionately facing violence. This includes Angela House’s Whole and Healthy Program (transitional housing and support for women immediately following incarceration), Project Row Houses Young Mothers Residency Program (a residency for low-income single mothers in the historically black neighborhood of Houston’s Third Ward), and Project Row Houses Young Mothers Employment Placement Program (a job training program for low-income single mothers). The aim is to support creative exchange between communities of care in varying contexts, particularly those in red and purple states where poor institutional support has long synced with a prevailing “maverick” ideology of independence and entrepreneurship.

This event takes place in conjunction with Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time: Against Capitalism’s Temporal Bullying (March 31 – May 13, 2017) at EFA Project Space. 

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Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time
Mar
31
to May 14

Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time

 Image: Amalle Dublon and Constantina Zavitsanos, Caduceus, 2016.  From the series “Crip Time,” in the Canaries broadsheet publication "Notes for the Waiting Room," 2017.

Image: Amalle Dublon and Constantina Zavitsanos, Caduceus, 2016.  From the series “Crip Time,” in the Canaries broadsheet publication "Notes for the Waiting Room," 2017.

Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time: Against Capitalism's Temporal Bullying focuses on how the body is articulated in various discourses oriented around health and proposes that better incorporation of the states of debility, disability, and rest into society (particularly their temporalities) would be resistive to forms of oppression. Recognizing that the failures of public health and biomedicine are felt by some disproportionately due to race, class, gender, sexuality, etc., this project provides a platform to explore collective forms of healing to deal with structural processes of exclusion.

Opening Reception: Friday, March 31, 6 - 9 pm

Please visit the Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time page for more information about the exhibition and concurrent public programs. 

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Surrounded by Me
Mar
18
to Mar 19

Surrounded by Me

Surrounded by Me
Saturday, March 18 and Sunday, March 19, 2017

Organized by: Tyler Coburn and Robin Simpson

Saturday, March 18th, 5:00 pm: Presentations by Felix Rietmann, Judith Rodenbeck, and Robin Simpson

Sunday, March 19th, 2:00 pm: Screening of video psychotherapy training tapes from the 1970s, as well as works by Richard Serra & Nancy Holt, Howardena Pindell, Kate Craig, Ulysses Jenkins, Sadie Benning, Jennifer Montgomery, Mike Crane, Tyler Coburn, and Sidsel Meineche Hansen

When video emerged in the 1970s, its simple camera and closed-circuit monitor setups were quickly diagnosed in art criticism. Rosalind Krauss, writing in the inaugural issue of October, argued that the ease of video feedback suggested the medium to be psychological by default, asking: “Yet, what would it mean to say, ‘The medium of video is narcissism?’” For Krauss, though video had the possibility of being a means of reflexive observation, the artists of her generation appeared to be trapped in a reflective loop. 

Outside the art world, video was developing a parallel life in the clinic. From the start of the 1970s, psychotherapists—including New York-based Milton M. Berger—employed video feedback techniques as an adjunct to the therapeutic process. Where Nancy Holt utters, “I am surrounded by me” in Boomerang (1974), as she negotiates the echoes of her voice fed back through a headset, so a colleague of Berger’s, facing a fleet of cameras and monitors, remarks, “I feel surrounded by myself.” The studio and the clinic thus functioned as staging grounds for narcissism, a term fast becoming paradigmatic of what Tom Wolfe called the “Me” decade. In this era, narcissism expanded beyond the constraints of Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis, coming to play a central role in post-industrial, service-based societies that valued individuation and self-encapsulation above all else.  

Comprising two evenings of presentations and screenings, Surrounded by Me interlaces clinical practice and critique, through an encounter between early video art, video psychotherapy, and the work of contemporary artists and scholars. While narcissism is a starting point, this program also considers the influence on art and psychotherapy of a number of disciplines that emerged contemporaneously and often interdependently, including behavioral therapy, neuroscience, cybernetics, and corporate pharmacology.

ORGANIZERS

Tyler Coburn is an artist and writer based in New York.  Coburn received a BA in Comparative Literature from Yale University and an MFA from the University of Southern California. He also served as a fellow in the Whitney Independent Study Program from 2014-2015. His work has been presented at South London Gallery; Kunstverein Munich; Kunsthalle Wien; CCA Glasgow; Western Front, Vancouver; Grazer Kunstverein; UCCA, Beijing; and Sculpture Center, New York. Coburn participated in the 11th Gwangju Bienniale and the 10th Shanghai Biennale. His writing has appeared in e-flux journal, Frieze, Dis, Mousse, and Rhizome.

Robin Simpson is an art historian and curator based in Montreal where he is Public and Education Coordinator at the Leonard and Bina Ellen Gallery, Concordia University. PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia, his research investigates the intersections between clinical and critical discourse and practices in early video art of the 1970s through to the early 80s. Select writing includes contributions to A Play to be Played Indoors or Out: This Book is a Classroom (Ed. Corinn Gerber et al. Passenger Books, 2012), Heteropolis (Ed. Adaptive Actions, 2013), Oh, Canada (ed. Denise Markonish, MIT Press, 2012) and Sarai 9: Projections (Ed. Raqs Media Collective and Shveta Sarda, CSDS, 2013). Frequently collaborating with artists, he recently co-realized Missives with Patrick Staff, a video program and broadsheet for the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver on direct address and communication in Canadian queer and trans video production. 

PRESENTERS

Felix Rietmann is a German-Swiss medical doctor trained in pediatrics, and a PhD candidate in the History of Science and the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in the Humanities at Princeton University. Before coming to the USA, Rietmann studied and worked in Germany, France, the UK, and Switzerland. His scholarship focuses on the history of film and video in child psychiatric research and practice.

Judith Rodenbeck is a cultural historian and critic specializing in art and intermedia of the 1950s and 1960s. Her current research examines the intersections of artistic practice and visual anthropology, read through the imaging of the bipedal; a second project examines the multimedia work of key women artists in the 1960s and 1970s. Rodenbeck is an Associate Professor in the Department of Media & Cultural Studies at the University of California, Riverside.

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Regarding the state of others
Dec
22
6:30 PM18:30

Regarding the state of others

A wave of global xenophobia reminds us, again, about the fragility of our emotional world: people seem unable to talk to, empathize with, or even see the other. The recent U.S. election has spurred a burst of crisis activism, begging an important question: when should this work be rapid, and when is it better to slow down? Chloë Bass and Naeem Mohaiemen have been discussing forms of political agency invested in smaller units: friends, collaborators, neighbors, families. 

Drawing from Bass and Mohaiemen's recent works (separately and together), this conversation examines, with the audience, the possibilities of understanding, the aesthetic effects of small acts, and ways to slow down and gently amplify each other. Considering the gendered economy of emotional labor, and the sometimes-forced separations between studio work and direct organizing, how can we open our forms to more possibilities?

This event is organized in conjunction with the exhibition Once More, with Feeling (November 11 - December 23, 2016).

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Screening: Charming Augustine
Dec
9
6:30 PM18:30

Screening: Charming Augustine

 Image: courtesy of Zoe Beloff

Image: courtesy of Zoe Beloff

Join us for a special screening of Zoe Beloff's Charming Augustine (2005), a 3D film inspired by the book Iconographie photographique de la Salpêtrière, a series of photographs and texts on hysteria published by a mental hospital in Paris in the 1870s. An experimental narrative based on the case of a young patient, Augustine, the film explores connections between attempts to document her mental states and the prehistory of narrative film. 

The screening will be followed with a Q&A with the artist.

Zoe Beloff is an artist and Professor at Queens College in the departments of Media Studies and Art. She works with a wide range of media including film, projection performance, installation and drawing. Each project aims to connect the present to past so that it might illuminate the future in new ways. She is currently working on a new project called “Emotions go to Work". Her projects have presented internationally at venues that include the Whitney Museum of American Art, Site Santa Fe, the M HKA museum in Antwerp, and the Pompidou Center in Paris.

This event takes place in conjunction with Once More, with Feeling (November 11 - December 23, 2016) at EFA Project Space. 

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The Emotional Labor Movement
Dec
7
6:30 PM18:30

The Emotional Labor Movement

 Image: courtesy of Megan Snowe

Image: courtesy of Megan Snowe

Please join for an introductory session of the Emotional Labor Movement with ELU-certified motion therapist Kendra Kambestad.

A link to book a 5 minute session will be available on the EFA Project Space site for Once More, with Feeling.

This is a chance to dip your toe into your subconscious emotional resources through movement and to improve your skills as a witness to expression.

Participants are invited to sign up for a 5 minute session of solo movement, with eyes closed and without choreography, with Kambestad, after which you will be asked to name the emotions you experienced while moving. Kambestad will provide feedback about what she witnessed in your movement and invite you to consider the connection between emotion, movement and body. While awaiting and/or healing from scheduled sessions, participants are invited to enjoy the Emotional Labor Union lounge and literature, engaging in emotional expression by observing others practice and perform their brief movement sessions. These sessions will run from 6:30 - 7:30 pm.

Those who are curious about this topic and who would rather not participate in the solo movement are nevertheless warmly welcome! There will be a Union representative present to answer any questions you may have about the ELU as well as participate in movement along side any individual who would rather not move solo. It is advised to come promptly at 6:30 PM no matter your scheduled session time.

At the conclusion of these sessions we will come together and discuss the relationship between emotion, movement, body, and the ways in which, by exploring this relationship, one can better understand how emotions take form in ourselves and our lives. Movement, identification, feedback and witnessing are all great tools to heighten awareness of the stages of emotional expression and labor. The ELU believes that greater awareness of process makes for a more empowered emoter, with greater capacity to represent their professional interests effectively.

This event is ideal for those interested in joining the Emotional Labor Union and getting a taste of the benefits our organization offers its members. It is also open to ELU members who would like to deepen their emotional resources. Whether your reasons are to increase impact of daily expression, broaden your emotional range, or better understand the science behind the feelings we have this is a great workshop for you!

This event takes place in conjunction with Once More, with Feeling (November 11 - December 23, 2016) at EFA Project Space. 

 

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From Wages for Housework to Wages for Facebook
Nov
30
6:30 PM18:30

From Wages for Housework to Wages for Facebook

 Image: courtesy of Laurel Ptak

Image: courtesy of Laurel Ptak

This conversation between Silvia Federici and curator and Laurel Ptak on Wednesday, November 30 explores connections between the International Wages for Housework Campaign and Wages for Facebook. The International Wages for Housework Campaign, founded in 1972, grew out of the International Feminist Collective in Italy, founded by Silvia Federici alongside Selma James, Brigitte Galtier, and Mariarosa Dalla Costa. The Campaign was formed to raise awareness of how housework and childcare are the base of all industrial work and to stake the claim that these unavoidable tasks should be compensated as paid wage labor. Wages for Facebook, founded by Laurel Ptak in 2013, draws on the 1970s feminist campaign Wages For Housework, to think through the relationships between capitalism, class and affective labor that are at stake within social media today. Debated widely in the press, at universities and via social media, the project has framed a broad public conversation about workers’ rights and the nature of labor, as well as the politics of its refusal, in our digital age.

Silvia Federici is a researcher, activist and educator. She was born and raised in Italy but came to the US in 1967 on a scholarship to study Philosophy at the University of Buffalo. Since then, she has taught at several universities in the US and also at the University of Port Harcourt in Nigeria. She is now Emerita Professor at Hofstra University (Long Island, NY) and lives in Brooklyn. A veteran feminist activist, Federici’s work is informed by and in dialogue with the many struggles which have animated her career. In her extensive work, Federici has addressed themes of enclosure, colonialism, labour, patriarchy and racism in areas as diverse as the advance of capitalist accumulation, international development policy, the labour of “immaterial workers,” the analysis of social movement strategy and anti-colonial struggle.

Laurel Ptak works across artistic, curatorial and pedagogical boundaries to address the social and political contours of art and technology. Her projects are interdisciplinary and discursive in nature and have taken up subject matter including alternative economies, debt, feminism, intellectual property and labor. Ptak teaches in the department of Art, Media and Technology at Parsons, The New School and is Director of the artist-run space Triangle Arts Association in New York City.

This event takes place in conjunction with Once More, with Feeling (November 11 - December 23, 2016) at EFA Project Space. 

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Polite, Pleasant, Endearing: The History of the Smile
Nov
18
6:30 PM18:30

Polite, Pleasant, Endearing: The History of the Smile

Katya Grokhovsky presents "Polite, Pleasant, Endearing: The History of the Smile", a performance-lecture, which explores the cultural, personal and historical significance, symbolism and the labor behind a smile, accompanied by a live dance interpretation by Jeremy Olson.

Katya Grokhovsky is an interdisicpinary artist based in New York City. She holds an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BFA from Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne University, Australia. Grokhovsky has received support through numerous residencies and fellowships including Atlantic Center for the Arts, FL, Studios at MASS MoCA, MA, SOHO20 Gallery NYC, BRIC Media Arts Fellowship, NYC, VOX Populi AUX Curatorial Fellowship, PA, Residency Unlimited, NYC, NARS (New York Residency and Studio Foundation), Santa Fe Art Institute Residency, NM, Watermill Center International Summer Residency, NY and others. She has been awarded the Dame Joan Sutherland Fund, APT (Artist pension trust) Membership, Australia Council for the Arts ArtStart Grant, NYFA Mentoring Program for Immigrant Artists, Freedman Traveling Scholarship for Emerging Artists, Australia and others. Her work has been exhibited extensively.
www.katyagrokhovsky.net

Jeremy Olson performances manipulate, misuse, and subject mundane actions and objects - for example, gesturing, speaking, walking, and tomatoes, ants, Gatorade, and Spandex – to rigorous but incongruous technical systems and procedures, especially those of choreography, law, and scientific visualization. In doing so, these actions and objects become sites for critical analysis as well as play, experimentation, and productive failure, a rehearsal of potential alternative forms and uses. A former dancer and physicist, his work has been exhibited in New York City and internationally, and he has performed with choreographers David Neumann, Trisha Brown, Polly Motley, among many others. He has an MFA from Parsons, The New School for Design and studied physics at Princeton and Harvard. 
j.eremy.org

This event takes place in conjunction with Once More, with Feeling (November 11 - December 23, 2016) at EFA Project Space. 

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