Dec
12
6:30 PM18:30

Event: Resonance and Repetition walk-through with the Curators and Guest Artist

A repetition-inspired gallery walk-through with the curators and the exhibition's NYC-based artists Hector Arce-Espasas and Pedro Neves Marques.

Resonance and Repetition is a group exhibition featuring work by 10 artists organized by curatorial office Rivet. Resonance and Repetition carries forward the office's ongoing research into object-oriented philosophy and its potential connections with contemporary art practice. This is the second iteration of a research and exhibition project related to the notion of resonance.

About Rivet: 

Rivet was founded in 2010 by Sarah Demeuse and Manuela Moscoso. The office focuses on long-term collaborations with artists and research that takes shape in different formats, from conversations, small circle reading groups, writing and workshops, to exhibitions. Sarah also translates and edits and is currently part of the 9th Mercosur Biennial Porto Alegre curatorial team. Manuela is co-director of Capacete, an international residency and research program located in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, Brazil.

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Nov
27
6:30 PM18:30

Resonance: The Specificities of Change within Systems & Entities at Vera List Center

Curatorial duo Rivet (Sarah Demeuse and Manuela Moscoso) considers resonance, a notion they take from philosopher Levi Bryant's The Democracy of Objects, as a perspective on, and potential way of, interacting with the world. Informed by their current exhibitions, Resonance at the Goethe-Institut New York and Resonance and Repetition on view at the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, as well as by ongoing discussions with collaborators and artists, their talk highlights artistic projects and so touches upon current models of resistance, activism, or withdrawal.

In particular, the following questions are raised in this presentation: How can we begin to talk about social impact when annulling distinctions between subjects and objects, or action and inaction? How can we move marks of distinction? In what kind of regimes of attraction can the art object participate, and what does it do differently from other objects?

Rivet was founded in 2010 by Sarah Demeuse and Manuela Moscoso. The office focuses on long-term collaborations with artists and research that takes shape in different formats, from conversations, small circle reading groups, writing and workshops, to exhibitions. Sarah also translates and edits, and is currently part of the 9th Mercosur Biennial Porto Alegre curatorial team. Manuela is co-director of Capacete, an international residency and research program located in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, Brazil.

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Nov
20
6:30 PM18:30

"The Event: Anoynymous Life of Patek Philippe": A Reading with Pedro Neves Marques

What happens when a Patek Philippe watch lingers between owners? Entering into these moments of suspension prompting questions about time, duration, and the life of objects, Pedro Neves Marques's text "The Anonymous Life of Patek Philippe," published earlier this year, tries out different scenarios. For this reading at EFA Project Space, the artist has invited three readers, Gautam Borooah, Media Farzin and Mariana Silva, to each embody the story of a Patek Philippe wristwatch. This text has been developed in discussion with Joshua Simon in parallel to The Economist/A Decade, a work also featured in Resonance and Repetition.

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Nov
8
6:00 PM18:00

Event: Opening Reception for Resonance and Repetition

November 9 - December 22, 2012

Curated by: Rivet

Artists: Hector Arce-Espasas, Ion Arregui, Bestué-Vives, Sara Deraedt, Aleksandra Domanović, Steffani Jemison, Katja Mater, Pedro Neves Marques, Julia Spínola

EFA Project Space is pleased to present Resonance and Repetition, a group exhibition featuring work by 10 artists organized by curatorial office RivetResonance and Repetition carries forward the office's ongoing research into object-oriented philosophy and its potential connections with contemporary art practice. This is the second iteration of a research and exhibition project related to the notion of resonance. Simultaneous to Resonance and Repetition, Rivet organizes a parallel exhibition and program, Resonance, at the Goethe-Institut New York's Wyoming Building in the East Village (October 26 - December 16, 2012). 

Starting with the basic terms. Resonance is the capacity of a system to be perturbed -- much like a glass of milk when exposed to salt. It speaks to how entities (whether humans beings, things, social systems or ideas) act upon each other according to local conditions. Repetition, on the other hand, allows us to think about an entity's stability over time -- either through a focus on affinities, resemblances or even disappearances. When put together, resonance and repetition present a strange case for an object's autonomy while simultaneously being open to affect, and be affected by, its environment. By joining these two terms, this exhibition prioritizes dynamic networks of assemblages and analyzes contemporary life as a set of changing conditions. Instead of looking at how humans represent things, Resonance and Repetition considers things and the varying roles they may play in specific moments.

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Nov
8
6:00 PM18:00

EXHIBITION: RESONANCE AND REPETITION

  SARA DERAEDT, STRESSLESS AND VACUUMS, 2012

SARA DERAEDT, STRESSLESS AND VACUUMS, 2012

November 9 - December 22, 2012

Curated by: Rivet

Artists: Hector Arce-Espasas, Ion Arregui, Bestué-Vives, Sara Deraedt, Aleksandra Domanović, Steffani Jemison, Katja Mater, Pedro Neves Marques, Julia Spínola

EFA Project Space is pleased to present Resonance and Repetition, a group exhibition featuring work by 10 artists organized by curatorial office Rivet. Resonance and Repetition carries forward the office's ongoing research into object-oriented philosophy and its potential connections with contemporary art practice. This is the second iteration of a research and exhibition project related to the notion of resonance. Simultaneous to Resonance and Repetition, Rivet organizes a parallel exhibition and program, Resonance, at the Goethe-Institut New York's Wyoming Building in the East Village (October 26 - December 16, 2012).

Starting with the basic terms. Resonance is the capacity of a system to be perturbed -- much like a glass of milk when exposed to salt. It speaks to how entities (whether humans beings, things, social systems or ideas) act upon each other according to local conditions. Repetition, on the other hand, allows us to think about an entity's stability over time -- either through a focus on affinities, resemblances or even disappearances. When put together, resonance and repetition present a strange case for an object's autonomy while simultaneously being open to affect, and be affected by, its environment. By joining these two terms, this exhibition prioritizes dynamic networks of assemblages and analyzes contemporary life as a set of changing conditions. Instead of looking at how humans represent things, Resonance and Repetition considers things and the varying roles they may play in specific moments.

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Oct
27
4:00 PM16:00

Workshop: with Caroline Woolard

Artist Caroline Woolard, co-founder of OurGoods.org and TradeSchool.coop, two barter economies for cultural producers, will discuss the theory and practice of barter (while erasing money). Barter occupies a grey area between gift giving and market transactions, creating potential for relationships based on mutal credit (not mutual debt). This workshop will discuss contemporary and historic barter communities: from myths of haggling savages to accounts of societies run on mutual aid. Participants will connect with potential barter partners and discuss the problems and possibilities of building trust, negotiating value, communicating clearly and getting projects done without money or aquiring debt. This event is organized in conjunction with the exhibition To Have and To Owe.

COST: food, drink, or help cleaning up
RSVP: Caroline@OurGoods.org

Caroline Woolard is an interdisciplinary artist and co-founder of OurGoods.org and TradeSchool.coop, two barter economies for cultural producers. Exploring solidarity economics and civic engagement, her work is collaborative and takes many forms—sculptures, websites, workshops, installations and performances. This work has been supported by the Whitney Museum, the Walker Art Center, Cooper Union, a MacDowell Colony fellowship, a Watermill Center residency, Esterni Milan, the optimism of strangers, unemployment benefits, and grants from iLAND, The Field and the Rockefeller Cultural Innovation Fund. Woolard is currently teaching at the New School, doing a Fellowship at Eyebeam: Art and Technology Center, and is a coordinating member of SolidarityNYC.org, an organization that seeks to connect, support, and promote grassroots economic justice groups in New York City.

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Oct
24
6:30 PM18:30

Lecture: Randy Martin

What is a derivative? Why does it matter to art or the humanities? NYU Professor of Art and Public Policy and Director of the Graduate Program in Arts Politics, Randy Martin, will speak about the relationship between financial derivatives and forms of debt in the production and circulation of art. This event is organized in conjunction with the exhibition To Have and To Owe.

Randy Martin is professor of art and public policy and director of the graduate program in arts politics at New York University. He is the author of Financialization of Daily Life; On Your Marx: Relinking Socialism and the Left; the Financial Logic of Risk Management; Performance as Political Act: The Embodied Self; and Critical Moves: Dance Studies in Theory and Politics; among other titles. He has edited collections on U.S. Communism, academic labor and, recently, Artistic Citizenship: A Public Voice for the Arts (with Mary Schmidt Campbell).

Martin holds degrees in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the City University of New York. He has studied, taught, and performed in dance, theater, and clowning in the United States and abroad. Previously, he served as professor and chair of social science at Pratt Institute, associate dean of faculty at Tisch School of the Arts, and as an editor of the journal Social Text.

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Oct
20
4:00 PM16:00

Workshop & Performance: Communal Debt as Sound

This workshop uses sound to express and manipulate debt.  Cassandra Thornton and Amber Vistein will lead participants to visualize debt as a substance, a thing, or a space, and then will train in vocal and phonation techniques to ground the visual debt translation into sound and/or movement-- creating a debt choir. The product of this workshop may be used for therapeutic reasons or to disrupt complacent economic sociality.

Performance: Communal Debt as Sound

Saturday, October 20, 5:30pm

Following the workshop, a performance by MassArt Chorus and the Communal Debt as Sound workshop participants, will take place at EFA Project Space. The project is expected to begin at EFA Project Space and then travel.


Cassandra Thornton may be found standing behind things and smiling. The smile may be misinterpreted as a sign of enthusiasm but it is in actuality a carefully implemented tactic developed to deter attention from her disappointment and skepticism about popular understanding of the limitations presented by reality.  This life-long frustration inspired a curiosity about the unknown and a series of projects that question or interact with what seems to be the regulating bodies of reality: institutions.  If an institution is a place, rhythm or habit that an individual subject and others can return to, then it creates many types of structures for Thornton to lurk behind.  Thornton is adept at the detached observation of how systems resonate in the unconscious of the individual and the collective. She has investigated aspects of the impact of debt through the assignation of physical shape and form, and most recently published interpretations of the manifestations of debt as related by contemporaries at the California College of the Arts. Learn more about her work at: www.cassiethornton.com, www.debt-visualizations.tumblr.com, www.physical-debt.tumblr.com www.physical-audit.tumblr.com.

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Oct
20
2:00 PM14:00

Event: On Municipal Debt with Ann Larson

To Have and To Owe hosts Occupy University with the Debt Discussion Series. Is your town experiencing a budget crisis? Is your city laying off workers and cutting services? If this is happening in your community, you are a debtor. Come and learn about municipal bonds, the favorite weapon of mafia capitalists everywhere!

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Oct
19
7:00 PM19:00

Event: Strike Debt, Contemporary Art and the Specter of Communization with Yates McKee

Join us for a teach-in with Yates McKee as To Have and To Owe hosts Occupy University with the Art of Debt Series. One of the most significant developments in contemporary art over the past decade has been the proliferation of prefigurative experiments with alternative economies and spaces of all sorts. The eruption of Occupy Wall Street last year superseded these efforts in a single bound, throwing into relief the extent to which most of the latter have remained within the institutional networks and discursive parameters of the Left artistic field. As Strike Debt gains momentum as a long-term dual-power movement, what might it mean to revisit the artistic field as a realm of experimentation, outreach, and mobilization? How might the pent-up historical lessons, creative energies, and material resources of contemporary art be channeled into the processes of "communization" that a full-fledged debt-resistance movement will require in order to be sustainable? Communization will be treated here as an open-ended challenge rather than a theoretical given.

Yates McKee is an art critic working in Occupy Wall Street; his work has appeared in venues including October, The Nation andTidal: Occupy Theory, Occupy Strategy.

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Oct
18
7:00 PM19:00

Event: The Visual Culture of Debt with Nick Mirzoeff

Neo-liberalism has visualized the debt society as a distinctly new arrangement of public space that Occupy has tried to counter. While debt is often said to be invisible, it is the means of naming, separating and ordering space in such a way that it comes to seem right. This teach-in will offer ways to analyze this visualization of debt, both in the present and by means of a comparison with the Civil Rights Movement. This event is a part of Occupy University's Art of Debt Series

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Oct
17
7:00 PM19:00

Event: A Brief history of Debt Resistance with George Carrentzis

To Have and To Owe hosts Occupy University with the Debt Discussion Series. Debt slavery, indenture, torture and imprisonment have a long history, but so does resistance to them. The class will trace the forms of debt resistance in the past, aiming to glean the knowledge of those involved in previous anti-debt struggles to help us in our debt resistance today.

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Oct
16
6:30 PM18:30

Event: Rethinking your MFA: Looking at Art as the By-Product-Of-Debt.HTML

DISCUSSION WITH CASSIE THORNTON

Join artist Cassie Thornton in a conversation about the value and values of an education in art. In art school we make art and debt, but the debt is invisible and private. What are we really contributing to when we get an MFA? What happens when we look at art as the by-product of debt?

This discussion is part of To Have And To Owe, an ongoing platform for thinking about debt taking place at EFA Project Space through October 27th.

Join artist Cassie Thornton in a conversation about the value and values of an education in art. In art school we make art and debt, but the debt is invisible and private. What are we really contributing to when we get an MFA? What happens when we look at art as the by-product of debt?

This discussion is part of To Have And To Owe, an ongoing platform for thinking about debt taking place at EFA Project Space through October 27th. For a complete list of related events visit

http://www.efanyc.org/to-have-and-to-owe/ and follow @tohaveandtoowe.

Cassandra Thornton may be found standing behind things and smiling. The smile may be misinterpreted as a sign of enthusiasm but it is in actuality a carefully implemented tactic developed to deter attention from her disappointment and skepticism about popular understanding of the limitations presented by reality. This life-long frustration inspired a curiosity about the unknown and a series of projects that question or interact with what seems to be the regulating bodies of reality: institutions. If an institution is a place, rhythm or habit that an individual subject and others can return to, then it creates many types of structures for Thornton to lurk behind. Thornton is adept at the detached observation of how systems resonate in the unconscious of the individual and the collective. She has investigated aspects of the impact of debt through the assignation of physical shape and form, and most recently published interpretations of the manifestations of debt as related by contemporaries at the California College of the Arts. Learn more about her work at: www.cassiethornton.com, www.debt-visualizations.tumblr.com, www.physical-debt.tumblr.com, & www.physical-audit.tumblr.com.


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Oct
11
6:30 PM18:30

Lecture: Richard Dienst

Theorist Richard Dienst will consider the social worlds created by debt and look at indebtedness as a form of social, economic and political bond—as explored in his recent book The Bonds of Debt: Borrowing Against the Common Good (Verso, 2011). This event is organized in conjunction with the exhibition To Have and To Owe.

Richard Dienst is the author of The Bonds of Debt: Borrowing Against the Common Good (Verso Books, 2011), among other titles.  He has published essays on contemporary theory, visual media, Bertolt Brecht, and Jean-Luc Godard in print and online journals including Historical Materialism and the Journal of Visual Culture and in anthologies (including New Media/Old Media [ed. Chun and Keenan, Routledge 2006]). His current book project, Remains to be Seen, will present a series of theoretical lessons about visual media, aimed at new practices of image-making and cultural activism. His blog collects his curent writing about the contemporary debt crisis:www.bondsofdebt.wordpress.com.  He holds degrees from University of California, Berkeley and Duke University and is currently Associate Professor of English at Rutgers.

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Oct
9
7:30 PM19:30

Event: Diego de la Vega Experimental Economies and Finance Research Group

Historically, debt has been an instrument to organize society. Some people make choices that bring them money; others make choices that only create problems and debts for themselves and those around them. The Chicago Religion is transparent in that sense: poetry is anti-economic and periodic corrections in the form of Pavlovian punishment are applied to those who practice it in order to fix the system. If we are to believe in Victorian to modernist common sense, anyone's bank account can go into the negative red numbers as the result of enough wrong decisions, miscalculations, and bad luck. But what happens when we apply OWS-era street smarts, understanding that it is right in the Financial District where the global casino peaks, and decide to play the game knowing the dices are loaded and the House always wins. If we acknowledge that money doesn't exist, that it is just an abstraction, an invention to better keep track of the score of those who collaborate with The System, then how do we liberate and trascend debt? By paying back to the last penny? How to proceed with ecological debt? Do we trade worthless over-issued under-backed dollars in exchange for priceless oxygen from the underdeveloped nations? And how would that solve the personal debt of the first world middle classes? Should we demand a better re-distribution of the loot or the abolition of sovereign debt? Yet, if debt is to be abolished, how do we deal with historic debts like those created by colonial appropriation of goods and free labor (slavery, mita) and their continuations and transmutations in neocolonial forms? With presentations by artist Fran Ilich, curator/academic Jennifer Flores Sternad and others. This event is organized in conjunction with the exhibition To Have and To Owe.

Fran Ilich is a writer and media-artist working on creative practices of experimental economies and finance, hacktivism and narrative media. He was a fellow at Eyebeam Art and Technology Center in New York, and is CEO of the Diego de la Vega cooperative media conglomerate. Ilich is author of the novels Metro-pop (1997), Tekno Guerrilla (2007), and Circa 94 (2010), as well as Another Narrative is Possible: Political Imagination in the Age of the Internet, the English version to be published by the Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam. He was editor at large of Sputnik Cultura Digital magazine, screenwriter of the show Interacción (Discovery Channel Latin America), researcher at Centro Multimedia México, and manager of the literature department at Centro Cultural Tijuana.

His work has been presented at Berlinale Talent Campus, Documenta 12, Transmediale, MIT Media In Transition, Walker Art Center, NYU, The World Bank, The Economist Mexico Summit 2011, Antidoto, SXSW, Electronic Literature Organization Symposium, and the Festival Mundial de la Digna Rabia del EZLN. He also directed the festivals Cinemátik 1.0, <net.net.net.mx> (MOCA - CalArts), and Borderhack, and directed narrative media seminars at Universidad Internacional de Andalucía, in Sevilla. He won the 2010 Leonardo Foundation scholarship to study at the M.A. program in Media Arts Histories at Donau-Krems Universität, Austria.

Jennifer Flores Sternad’s work as an academic, curator and writer focuses on militant art, performance, and artistic practices aligned with left social movements in the Americas. Her work has been published in Art and Activism in the Age of Globalization; Live Art in LA, 1970-1983; MEX/LA: Mexican Modernisms in Los Angeles; Zona de Poesia Árida, Coletivos de Arte; Haciendo Tiempo: Arte Radical, 1999-2004; The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinas & Latinos and in the journals GLQ, Contemporary Theatre Review,  The Journal of American Drama and Theater and Interreview. She has curated and directed exhibitions, conferences and public art events in L.A., Mexico City, Buenos Aires and Santiago and she is co-founder with Fran Ilich of the research/media art project Collective Intelligence Agency. She received a Bachelors degree in Literature magna cum laude from Harvard in 2005 and a Master’s degree in Art History from UCLA in 2008. She entered the NYU PhD program in American Studies in 2010.

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Oct
6
1:00 PM13:00

Event: Arts & Labor Discussion and Quilting Session

There is a debt resistance movement building across the country. Disparate communities are finding common threads amongst our conditions of debt, building solidarity and mobilizing against the servitude and destruction caused by its immensity. 

As part of this mobilization, Arts and Labor has initiated DEBT SQUARES, a series of open workshops inspired by the tradition of craft circles, during which everyone is invited to sew together fabric squares, express our personal relationship with different kinds of debt, and bring our shared conditions to the open.

We are not alone.

We are bringing this project into town squares, parks, art spaces, and community centers, all around New York City.  On Saturday, October 6, at 1:00pm DEBT SQUARES will be at The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, asking the following questions:

What are the relationships between cultural production and debt? In particular, how do the economics of the art world really work? How does the industry serve art workers? How is value created and traded? How does the role of patronage control the industry from commercial to non-profit? Why are so many people willing to work for free for so little return? Who has the power? Who ultimately benefits? How can we resist debt in the art world?

By initiating conversations about the financial risks art workers take to produce their art, the amount of student debt from BFA to MFA, the constant high cost of living in an expensive city, the industry’s reliance on serial unpaid internships, the precarious work with no healthcare or retirement plan in sight, we invite everyone to join us and discuss how we can build a more equitable future in the arts that is debt free.

Materials provided.

Below is a loose color and size guidelines for each debt square. Improvisation and rebuttal is highly encouraged:

RED = Student Debt / Education

YELLOW = Mortgage / Housing

GREEN= Credit Card / Commercial

BLUE= Medical

RAINBOW, PASTELS & PATTERNS = Love / Care / Friendship / Family...

Arts & Labor  is a working group founded in conjunction with the New York General Assembly for #occupywallstreet. We are artists and interns, writers and educators, art handlers and designers, administrators, curators, assistants, and students. We are all art workers and members of the 99%. Arts & Labor is dedicated to exposing and rectifying economic inequalities and exploitative working conditions in our fields through direct action and educational initiatives. By forging coalitions, fighting for fair labor practices, and reimagining the structures and institutions that frame our work, Arts & Labor aims to achieve parity for every member of the 99%. www.artsandlabor.org.

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Oct
4
6:30 PM18:30

Lecture: Leigh Claire La Berge & Annie McClanahan

To Have and to Owe co-organizer Leigh Claire La Berge and theorist Annie McClanahan will share their respective work on cultural representations of debt--from how the language and metaphors of finance impact how we understand the social world around us to how photographics depictions of foreclosure show economies and aesthetics in tandem and in tension.

Leigh Claire La Berge is Assistant Professor in the English Department at Saint Mary's University in Halifax. She has written on politics in the university setting, Slavoj Žižek, the tv show The Wire and is currently completing the book Scandals and Abstraction: Financial Form in Contemporary American Literary Cultures.

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Oct
3
7:00 PM19:00

Event: Debt & Growth with Andrew Ross

To Have and To Owe hosts Occupy University with the Debt Discussion Series. Andrew Ross's discussion focuses on why our present money system can only function in a growing economy. Money is created as interest-bearing debt: it only comes into being when someone promises to pay back even more of it. But growth, especially when finance-driven, is ecologically destructive. How do we reconcile this contradiction?

For Andrew Ross' bio, please click here.

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Sep
21
6:00 PM18:00

Event: To Have and To Owe Opening & Perforamance

Join EFA Project Space and organizers Leigh Claire La Berge and Laurel Ptak for the New York City opening of To Have and To Owe. Performance by artist Cassie Thornton will lead the audience to engage with debt's physical representation, activating it as a malleable substance that might change through collective re-evaluation. There will be a brief introduction about the project To Have and To Owe by co-organizer Laurel Ptak.

Cassandra Thornton may be found standing behind things and smiling. The smile may be misinterpreted as a sign of enthusiasm but it is in actuality a carefully implemented tactic developed to deter attention from her disappointment and skepticism about popular understanding of the limitations presented by reality.  This life-long frustration inspired a curiosity about the unknown and a series of projects that question or interact with what seems to be the regulating bodies of reality: institutions.  If an institution is a place, rhythm or habit that an individual subject and others can return to, then it creates many types of structures for Thornton to lurk behind.  Thornton is adept at the detached observation of how systems resonate in the unconscious of the individual and the collective. She has investigated aspects of the impact of debt through the assignation of physical shape and form, and most recently published interpretations of the manifestations of debt as related by contemporaries at the California College of the Arts. Learn more about her work at: www.cassiethornton.com, www.debt-visualizations.tumblr.com, www.physical-debt.tumblr.com www.physical-audit.tumblr.com.

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Sep
21
to Oct 27

EXHIBITION: TO HAVE AND TO OWE

  • EFA Project Space 2nd Floor (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

September 21 - October 27, 2012

Opening reception: September 21, 6 - 8 pm

Gallery hours: Wednesday through Saturday, 12 - 6 pm

Events with: Arts & Labor, Richard Dienst, Jennifer Flores Sternad, Fran Ilich, Randy Martin, Annie McClanahan, Occupy University, Cassie Thornton, and Caroline Woolard

Infographics by: Brendan Griffiths, Zak Klauck & Mylinh Trieu Nguyen

Organized by: Leigh Claire La Berge & Laurel Ptak with assistance from designer Eric Nylund & intern Gina Bull

Debt has been inscribed as a fundamental mechanism of power, force and subjugation in contemporary society and it affects nearly all of us in one way or another through forms like credit card, healthcare, student and mortgage debt as well as our national debt and the indebtedness of nations to one another. While debt is front and center as an issue in both politics and our personal lives, the basis of its control seems directly related to the fact that it is experienced so abstractly. Debt exists as both an absence and a presence. And though debt is socially enforced it is almost always individually experienced and this tension makes it difficult to represent collectively. To Have And To Owe asks, what happens if we work towards undoing debt’s unrepresentabilty? What if we experienced debt as a shared cultural form that is perceptible, communicable or materialized? How can debt be rendered as a nuanced historical, philosophical and even aesthetic problem in all of its social thickness inside American life?

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Aug
30
6:00 PM18:00

Event: Residency for Arts Workers as Artists 2012 Open House and Reception

EFA Project Space hosts the 3rd annual Residency for Arts Workers as Artists Open House and Reception

Thursday, August 30, 2012 6:00 pm

The Residency for Arts Workers as Artists is the only residency of its kind, providing artists-- who work untiringly for arts institutions as administrators, curators, educators, and promoters-- with the work space and encouragement to focus on their individual artistic practices.  The residency begins with a three-week intensive in August aimed as a catalyst for experimentation and new reflection. During these three weeks, the seven selected participants take over EFA Project Space and transform it into an open, collective studio.

Please join EFA Project Space and out 2012 residents-- Johnathan Durham, Francis Estrada, Howard Halle, Elizabeth Hamby, Jamie Kim, Naomi Miller and Sarah Walko-- at the conclusion of the intensive portion of the residency for a reception and private viewing of the artists' work in progress.

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Aug
8
6:30 PM18:30

Event: A Conversation with the 2011/12 Arts Workers As Artists Residents

A CONVERSATION WITH THE 2011/12 ARTS WORKERS AS ARTISTS RESIDENTS

Wednesday, August 8, 2012, 6:30pm

Gisela Insuaste, Theresa Marchetta, Douglas Paulson, Roddy Schrock, Chad Stayrook, David Terry

As we get ready for our next round of the Residency for Arts Workers as Artists, we invite you to join the “graduating” 2011-12 residents to share stories, work, and discuss the particularities of negotiating between an independent art practice and a demanding position at a cultural org.

Q & A led by Michelle Levy, founder of the Residency for Arts Workers as Artists, and Director, EFA Project Space.

Still in its pilot phase, the Residency for Arts Workers as Artists identifies a distinct population of practicing artists who work untiringly to support fellow artists through positions at arts organizations. This unique residency aims to nurture and catalyze the artist/arts workers’ artistic aspirations while addressing how these dual roles can effectively strengthen one another. Participants are nominated and selected based on their outstanding contribution to the art community, and their potential for artistic growth through a peer engaged, interactive environment.

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Jul
27
6:30 PM18:30

Event: Tales of Becoming

EFA Project Space will host a closing event for its current exhibition Cultural Transference. The event will consist of two presentations under the heading "Tales of Becoming," featuring a screening of Nicolas Dumit Estevez's baptism which is documented in his project Born Again: A Lebanese-Dominican Dominican York is Born Again as a Bronxite,  and a performative reading by Pablo Helguera, and actress Laura Lona, from "The Boy Inside the Letter" (2008), a diary written during his first four years in the United States, after moving from Mexico City to Chicago for art school. The two readings will be followed by a reception.

The reception will begin at 6:30pm, the screening and performance will begin at 7pm. For additional information about the closing reception, please email projectspace@efanyc.org.

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Jun
21
6:30 PM18:30

Event: Turning the World

Participants: Firelei Báez, Hubert Czerepok, Dread Scott, Juliana Irene Smith. Moderator: Sara Reisman.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Cultural TransferenceTurning the World is a conversation among artists Firelei Báez, Hubert Czerepok, Dread Scott, and Juliana Irene Smith, whose vastly different practices examine how culture and cultural production are continually being challenged and transformed. Panelists will present examples of past work while addressing questions of cultural authenticity and how art can facilitate a progressive and broader understanding of identity politics.

Cultural Transference presents recent artwork by sixteen international and New York-based artists whose practices are actively engaged with the transformation of culture in contemporary art and everyday life. Through transactions and exchanges - social, spiritual, economic, and political - artworks featured in the exhibition collectively express how cultural practice is reciprocally changing and being changed by its context. 

Panel Bios

Firelei Báez was born in the Dominican Republic to Dominican and Haitian parents and lives and works in New York. Báez received her BFA from Cooper Union, and her MFA at Hunter College. Her work has been exhibited in various national and international institutions, including the New Jersey City Museum, El Museo Del Barrio, The Cortona Archeological Museum (Cortona, Italy), The Caribbean African Diaspora Institute and the Bronx Artist Biennial. She participated in Aljira Center for Contemporary Art's Emerge Program, and was a recent resident artist in The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. She has received many awards including The Joan Mitchell Painters and Sculptors Award, The Jaque and Natasha Gelman Award, and The Bronx Recognizes Its Own Award among others. 

Hubert Czerepok was born in Slubice (Poland) 1973. Graduated from Academy of Fine Arts in Poznan in 1999. In years 2002-2003 attended the Jan van Eyck Academie in Maastricht in Netherlands and in 2004-2005 the Higher Institute for Fine Arts Flanders in Antwerpen in Belgium. Participated in various group shows in Poland and abroad including solo exhibitions “Devil’s Island” at the La Criée Centre for Contemporary Art in Rennes in France and “Haunebu” at the Zak | Branicka Gallery in Berlin, Germany. Currently works as a Phd at The University of Arts in Poznan, Poland. Currently living and working in Wroclaw.

In 1989 Dread Scott’s work became the center of controversy over its use of the American flag while he was a student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he received a BFA. His art has frequently been part of public dialogue. The 2006 Whitney Biennial included his art in the Down by Law section. His work was featured in a survey at MoCADA and included in shows at PS1/MoMA and the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. He has received a Creative Capital Foundation grant, fellowships from NYFA and is currently a resident in the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Workspace Residency.

Juliana Irene Smith is an American artist based in Ramallah and Zurich. She has a BFA in Photography from Parsons School of Design in New York and a Masters in Public Art from the University of Applied Arts and Sciences in Lucerne, Switzerland. Awards include a public art grant from the Cultural Office in Switzerland, a residency at the Qattan Foundation, Masters Grant in Arts and Design from IKEA, Language grant from the Goethe Institute and travel grants from Pro Helvetia. She has participated in three Triangle Arts Workshops, Jordan, Lebanon and Palestine. In 2010 she participated in the Mobile Artistic Platform in India with Reloading Images and in 2011 she participated in ART OMI in New York. Her latest performance Pathetic Looser was part of the /sin/ Video and Performance Art Festival with Qattan Foundation in Ramallah and Jerusalem. She was a guest curator at Makan Art Space in Amman, 2010 with the public art exhibition Utopian Airport Lounge. This past fall, she exhibited in the On/ Off Language Jerusalem Show with Al Ma’mal and taught a performance in public art workshop at Darat Al Funun in Amman. Recent projects include, Project Dar, Zorten, Ping Pong, and Hotel des Inmigrantes. She is currently working on a research action project, “The Responsible Artist” with Gilles Fontaine.


Sara Reisman is Director of New York City's Percent for Art program which commissions permanent artworks for City-owned public spaces. Recently commissioned artists include Mary Miss, Ben Rubin, Odili Donald Odita, Karyn Olivier, Tattfoo Tan, and Mary Mattingly, among others, all working in diverse media and themes. Reisman has organized exhibitions and written about public engagement and public art, social practice, the aesthetics of globalization, and site-specificity for the Philadelphia Institute of Contemporary Art, Queens Museum of Art, The Cooper Union School of Art, Smack Mellon, The Bronx Museum of Art, Socrates Sculpture Park, Momenta Art, Aljira, the Kunsthalle Exernergasse, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Banjaluka, Republic of Srpska, among others. Reisman was the 2011 Critic-in-Residence at Art Omi, an international visual artist residency in upstate New York, and is the inaugural guest curator in 2012-2013 at Forever & Today.

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Jun
15
to Jul 12

EXHIBITION: CULTURAL TRANSFERENCE

  • EFA Project Space 2nd Floor (map)
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 Yoko Inoue, The Seven Transformations of Hello Kitty, 2010.

Yoko Inoue, The Seven Transformations of Hello Kitty, 2010.

June 15 - July 27, 2012

Artists: Firelei Baez, Matthew Cowan, Hubert Czerepok, Nicolas Dumit Estevez, Pablo Helguera, Christopher K. Ho, Yoko Inoue, LoVid, Umesh Maddanahalli, Dread Scott and Kyle Goen, Allison Smith, Juliana Irene Smith, Shinique Smith, and Elisabeth Smolarz. 

Curator: Sara Reisman

Cultural Transference presents recent artwork by sixteen international and New York-based artists whose practices are actively engaged with the transformation of culture in contemporary art and everyday life. Through transactions and exchanges - social, spiritual, economic, and political - artworks featured in the exhibition collectively express how cultural practice is reciprocally changing and being changed by its context. Depending on the mobility of those in the role of producing culture and those who consume it, the transmission of culture can move quickly or slowly through space and time.

The exhibition features video, sculpture, performance, installation, collage, and craft-based projects by artists who draw from the cultural references and contexts of Afghanistan, the Caribbean, China, India, Iraq, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Palestine, Poland, and the United States, among other places. Together, the artists' projects communicate the areas where cultures and cultural production mutate, are appropriated, and remixed resulting in experiences that push against stereotypes, and defy the logic of accepted cultural mores.

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