Event: Exhibition Redux
Dec
11
6:30 PM18:30

Event: Exhibition Redux

2014-1211_AWP-ExhibitionRedux

Reprisals, Reimaginings, and Revisions:
A Series of Events Speculating on What-Might-Have-Been, Part Two:

Exhibition Redux: A Conversation with Cecilia Alemani, Greta Byrum, Annabel Daou, and Marcia E. Vetrocq

In conjunction with our current exhibition, A Wicked Problem, a survey of impossible exhibition proposals, we're looking at the ways projects from the past have been revisited, thus proving that nothing is ever really "finished," and everything is up for adaptation and expansion. Please join us for an informal conversation with curator Cecilia Alemani, who recently organized Pier 54, a response to a 1971 exhibition by Willoughby Sharp on Pier 18, artists Greta Byrum and Annabel Daou, who curated an exhibition in the gallery that is now EFA Project Space in 2006 of unrealized artist projects, which they are reprising for A Wicked Problem, and critic Marcia E. Vetrocq, who guest-edited a special section of the July-August 2013 issue of The Brooklyn Rail on the subject of re-staging exhibitions.

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Event: Finishing Unfinished Films
Dec
2
7:00 PM19:00

Event: Finishing Unfinished Films

Reprisals, Reimaginings, and Revisions: A Series of Events Speculating on What-Might-Have-Been, Part One: Double Feature With Maya Deren and Bruce Checefsky

In conjunction with our current exhibition, A Wicked Problem, a survey of impossible exhibition proposals, we're looking at the ways projects from the past have been revisited, thus proving that nothing is ever really "finished," and everything is up for adaptation and expansion. Join us for a joint screening of The Witch's Cradle (1943, 12 min.), an unfinished, silent short film written and directed by Maya Deren and co-starring Marcel Duchamp, with Witch's Cradle (2014, 10 min), a reimagining of Deren's film by Bruce Checefsky.
Followed by a conversation between critic Jennifer Krasinski and Bruce Checefsky.

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Event: Lucid Methods
Nov
18
6:30 PM18:30

Event: Lucid Methods

  © Meredyth Sparks,   The Slits/Cut  , 2011. Digital scan mounted to Sintra, 43 x 32.5 inches

© Meredyth Sparks, The Slits/Cut, 2011. Digital scan mounted to Sintra, 43 x 32.5 inches

Lucid Methods, a panel on images, their meaning and their making

Organized by Francisco Correa-Cordero

Lucid Methods will bring together a group of artists, curators and writers for an informal discussion about images from the perspective of image-making and picture-taking. Speakers will talk about the relevance of image-production in a culture already saturated with photographs, image appropriation and other cannibalistic practices and the inherent capacity of the medium to advance itself. Moderated by artist and writer Gabriel H. Sanchez, the panel will include Meredyth Sparks (artist), Sophie Mörner (publisher, Capricious), Walker Waugh (director, Yancey Richardson Gallery) and Lindsey Castillo (curator of public programs, Camera Club of New York).

 

Sophie Mörner, born in Stockholm, Sweden has been a New York resident since 1999. She has been a central figure in what has come to be a new photography movement in and around New York. As the founder, owner and curator of the widely respected Capricious Magazine and Publishing founded in 2004, and newly established Capricious 88 Gallery, she has provided exposure for new, up-and-coming photographers, as well the often marginalized work of the queer community. 

Born in 1972 in Panama City, Florida, Meredyth Sparks earned a BFA from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and an MFA from Hunter College. Sparks has been showing internationally for the last decade, including solo exhibitions at The Arts Club of Chicago (IL); Veneklasen/Werner (Berlin); Galerie Catherine Bastide (Brussels); and Galerie Frank Elbaz (Paris). Her work has been included in group exhibitions at The Whitney Museum of American Art (New York); ICA (Boston); CAPC Museum of Contemporary Art (Bordeaux); Les Recontres d’Arles Photographie (Arles); Centro Galego de Arte Contemporanea, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); and The 2nd Moscow Biennial. Sparks lives and works in Queens, NY.

Gabriel H. Sanchez is an artist and writer based in New York, NY, as well as the current Photo Essay Editor at the social news and entertainment company, BuzzFeed. Many of his photographs document the pageantry and excess of what is considered the "art world” in New York City.  While his role as BuzzFeed's Photo Essay Editor is tasked with curating exceptional photography into the power of the social-web to form a new sort of hyper-sharable photo essay for the 21st century. Having recently completed his graduate studies at Parsons the New School For Design, he currently holds two degrees in Photography and has published texts on topic in various academic journals, including Artforum and Artslant.com.

Peter Scott is an artist, writer, curator and director of the non-profit space carriage trade. His work has been exhibited most recently at Rectangle in Brussels, Martos Gallery, Marianne Boesky Gallery, Sometimes (works of art) and 3A Gallery in New York, Galerie Sophie Scheidecker, Paris.

Walker Waugh is the Director of Yancey Richardson Gallery, one of the preeminent dealers of contemporary fine art photography in the world. The gallery represents a range of emerging, mid-career, and 20th century photographers, including Laura Letinsky, Andrew Moore, and Sebastiao Salgado, among many others. Waugh previously co-founded and was the director of WORK Gallery, a red tin shack on the Red Hook, Brooklyn waterfront dedicated to emerging artists working across all mediums. He also works as an independent curator and is a contributor to Musee Magazine. He is a graduate of Williams College and is originally from the Flint Hills of Kansas.

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Event: A Wicked Problem Opening Reception
Nov
14
6:00 PM18:00

Event: A Wicked Problem Opening Reception

EFA Project Space

323 W. 39th Street, 2nd Floor

Gallery Hours: Weds through Sat, noon to 6 pm

Participants: Emily Baierl, Greta Byrum and Annabel Daou, Hank Ehrenfried, Caitlin Foley and Misha Rabinovich, Katya Grokhovsky, Oree Holban, Antony Hudek, Felix Kalmenson, Audra Lambert, Clarinda Mac Low, Marina Noronha and Micah Silver, Beth Reitmeyer, Emily Thomas, and Anuj Vaidya

A Wicked Problem is organized by Claire Barliant, Curatorial Advisor, EFA Project Space; Lauren Bierly, Assistant Director, EFA Project Space; Michelle Levy, Director, EFA Project Space; and Meghana Karnik and Minzoo Park, EFA Project Space Exhibition Interns

Read the press release here.

 

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Event: Experimental Conversations: As We Were Saying: Art and Identity in the Age of “Post”
Oct
21
7:00 PM19:00

Event: Experimental Conversations: As We Were Saying: Art and Identity in the Age of “Post”

EFA Project Space is pleased to host one of a series of events, "Experimental Conversations with Gordon Hall," presented by BOFFO. Discussions between artists (and curators) in proximity to their work, these events seek to explore the performative possibilities of speech in relation to exhibitions, objects, and galleries. Rather than talking "about" artworks, this series experiments with methods of talking with, to, around, through, and because of artworks.

These conversations are part of an ongoing strain of research in Hall’s work concerning the materiality of discourse and its construction by various cultural producers. Drawing particularly on Hall's 
Center for Experimental Lectures, these talks will offer alternatives to the codified form of the gallery talk, with unique approaches developed by Hall in collaboration with each participating cultural producer.

Attendance is limited, please RSVP.

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Event: The New York Times Feminist Reading Group
Oct
18
3:00 PM15:00

Event: The New York Times Feminist Reading Group

 

Please join us October 18th at the EFA Project Space for The New York Times Feminist Reading Group. The reading group will be dedicated to looking at Saturday, October 18th's edition of The New York Times from a feminist perspective. Since 2009, Kennedy and Linden have been organizing periodic reading groups, free and open to all, dedicated to examining that day's issue of The New York Times. Reading groups have been held all over New York City and beyond, including at DISPATCH, P•P•O•W Gallery, the New Museum, and Murray Guy.

This event is organized in conjunction with the exhibition, As We Were Saying: Art and Identity in the Age of "Post"

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Event: The Unknown Play Project with Alexis Clements
Oct
8
6:30 PM18:30

Event: The Unknown Play Project with Alexis Clements

b&w building background.jpg

In conjunction with As We Were Saying: Art and Identity in the Age of "Post", EFA Project Space presents:

Wednesday, October 8th, 6:30 PM: The Unknown Play Project, led by Alexis Clements, involves a cross-country journey to explore shifting identities and politics among lesbians and queer women through the lens of a handful of lesbian & queer spaces. This project combines community-based play readings and documentary filmmaking. Join us for a discussion about the project and an informal reading of the play, UNKNOWN, that inspired it. Members of the EFA community, along with some of those who show up for the reading, will read the play aloud. Inspired by the Lesbian Herstory Archives in Brooklyn, NY, UNKNOWN asks how we come to know a person as something more than the role they play in our lives or the labels society applies to them.  
 

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Event: As We Were Saying Opening Reception
Sep
12
6:00 PM18:00

Event: As We Were Saying Opening Reception

 Cassandra Guan,  Women's Times , 2014

Cassandra Guan, Women's Times, 2014

As We Were Saying: Art and Identity in the Age of “Post”

September 12th – October 25th, 2014
Opening Reception: September 12th, 6 – 8 pm

Does “identity politics” still matter? Maybe a better question would be: does difference still matter?

Since the mid-nineties, when interest in identity-centric issues began to wane, traditional categories based on race, class, gender, and sexual orientation, have been in question. Identities are now considered relational and fluid rather than inherent and fixed, and it is often stated that we have entered the age of “post”—post-racial, post-critical, post-AIDS. Passive retrospection has replaced active debate.

The artists in this exhibition wrestle with the question of what identity and difference mean today. Works by A.K. Burns and Katherine Hubbard, Josh Faught, and Cassandra Guan reflect on the erosion of community by considering past moments when identity was a cornerstone of political change. Other artists, including Ignacio Lang, Suzanne McClelland, and Jason Simon, examine the way media shapes and constructs identities in a nuanced way, while Jen Kennedy and Liz Linden’s The New York Times Feminist Reading Group is a public forum that encourages frank discussion about women’s rights. The question of what identity means now is taken up by Josh Kline and Simone Leigh, who both explore new ways of representing the “other” through figuration; Nikita Gale, whose prints simultaneously pay homage to the legacy of identity politics while protesting being pigeonholed as an artist of color; and Shelly Silver, whose video gives a diverse group of New Yorkers a chance to air their views on subjects ranging from existence to economics. Michael Wang theorizes that difference still matters—and comments on the complications of hybridity—with a sculpture that encourages interaction between domestic and feral pigeons, the latter free to come and go as they wish through one of the gallery’s windows. 

Gallery Hours: Weds through Sat, noon to 6 pm
Read the press release here.

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Jul
1
7:00 PM19:00

Event: Others will surely follow and Caterpillar: Performances by Ferrari & Higgins an Medina

others will surely follow, Danyel Ferrari and Rachel Higgins

Rachel Higgins and Danyel Ferrari present a screening and selection of the projects created by both artists and audience using their (mobile structures) over the course of the exhibition. Drawing on the history of the body's performance/labor in Times Square--the street, the stage, and the semi-private pornographic theaters of the pre-gentrification era--Higgins and Ferrari are creating mobile structures to host a variety of projects intended for use by both participating artists and the general audience. Composed of mobile seating arrangements and a cart that falls somewhere between a traveling film unit and a movable stage, these objects are available to arrange for screenings, performances or events. Designed to also maneuver out o the gallery and travel into the street, these components will be activated throughout the run of the exhibition, allowing for multiple functions and configurations, and questioning our understanding of mobility as both freedom and precocity.

Caterpillar, Glendalys Medina 

After practicing the rap song "One Mic" by NAS for months to learn how to become an MC, Glendalys Medina realized that vulnerability is her true source of power. So she wrote her own song, "Caterpillar," a song about transformation, which she will perform.

“No longer needing my uniform I disrobe. No longer needing my Mc pumas to feel assertive I place them in an acrylic box becoming my platform.” -Glendalys Medina

The music that accompanies this performance is by Flying Lotus.

These performances are organized in conjunction with Failing to Levitate on view June 6 - July 3, 2014. Please click here for more information about the exhibition and follow the projects as they evolve at failingtolevitate.net.

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Jun
27
7:00 PM19:00

Event: Do I Know What I'm Doing? discussion & A Pattern video screening

FTL-2014-0627_IKnowWhatImDoing-APAttern-web.jpg

7:00 - 8:00pm "Do I Know What I'm Doing?" discussion

8:00 - 9:30pm  A Pattern video screening

"Do I Know What I'm Doing?" Please join us for a discussion of liability issues for several dangerous hypothetical artworks.  

Providing Insurance Solutions for art that looks like reality: HOW IS IT DONE? What happens when organizationally sponsored social practice art is produced in environments that are difficult to control? Does art produce NEW and ORIGINAL liabilities? Does insurance define the final frontier of institutionally sponsored art? Are there established protocols and loopholes (wink wink)? Should artists make insurance considerations when proposing new work? Can EXCITING, new breakthroughs happen in this field? and Do I (Even) Know What I’m Doing

Calling all Artists, Organizations, and Insurance Agents: Contribute knowledge for the benefit of all! Please join us for our open discussion on art and insurance liability. 

A Pattern is a screening of a video essay made from a configuration of notes, and images exploring the construction of the parts of Manhattan called The Garment District, 42nd street and Times Square. It is a desire for presence, a legitimate address, without anything else than it's own production. The screening will be housed in the structure designed and built by Rachel Higgins and Danyel Ferrari.

This event is organized in conjunction with the exhibition Failing to Levitate on view June 6 - July 3, 2014. Please click here for more information about the exhibition and follow the projects as they evolve atfailingtolevitate.net.

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Jun
25
7:00 PM19:00

Event: Heather Love and Jen Rosenblit

Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 7:00 - 9:00pm

At EFA Project Space, 2nd floor of EFA Center (323 W. 39th St, Manhattan)

Building on her recent work on the Stigma Archive and queer affect, Prof. Heather Love will facilitate a participatory lecture/workshop in response to Jen Rosenblit’s improvisational movements and experiments with "presence." 

Prof. Love is currently at work on a project researching the source materials for and archives of Erving Goffman’s 1963 book, Stigma : On the Management of Spoiled Identity. Goffman theorized stigma as a trait or characteristic that could severely damage, or spoil, his or her identity. Physical disability, conviction of a felony, and homosexuality are all examples of stigma in Goffman’s work.

Jen Rosenblit’s improvisational movements in Scenarios for Hovering explore the idea of levitation as a way to understand the body’s relationship to the physical space and other works. She does not claim a space for her performance, but rather looks for ways to be present, to show up and decide, in the moment, how appearing responds to the contents of a space, or does not. 

This event is organized in conjunction with the exhibition Failing to Levitate on view June 6 - July 3, 2014. Please click here for more information about the exhibition and follow the projects as they evolve atfailingtolevitate.net.

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Jun
19
6:00 PM18:00

Event: Failing to Levitate Public Reception

Artists: Anhoek School (orchestrated by Mary Walling Blackburn and Rafael Kelman), A Pattern, Malin Arnell, Ethan Breckenridge, Dillon de Give, Bill Dietz, Danyel Ferrari, Rachel Higgins, Mitch McEwen, Glendalys Medina, Jen Rosenblit

Curated by: Kerry Downey and Natasha Marie Llorens

With guest speaker Heather Love

Failing to Levitate is a platform to think about failure and vulnerability in art practices that are based in the social, in the encounter between people. The project links spaces, bodies, objects, and events in order to consider the ways we gather, socialize, and are affected by the physical conditions of shared space: elevators, board rooms, cars, group exhibitions, Times Square, dance floors...   

As curators we decided to borrow our title from Bruce Nauman's eponymous photograph, which shows the artist earnestly attempting to levitate in his studio and then slumping to the floor awkwardly when he fails. This work speaks to the (still) heroic narrative of the lone artist striving towards transcendence through an act of sheer will. We address failure and vulnerability as key terms in this project because any real discussion of either outside of a binary structure challenges the idea of self-mastery. Self-mastery, an ideology that tolerates no weakness, is in turn foundational to masculinism. We appropriate "failing to levitate" in order to attend, instead, to how physical and social spaces fail us, or create spaces for being vulnerable together.

More information on the events schedule, artists' texts, and links to research can be found here:www.failingtolevitate.netFor press inquiries, please contact Lauren Bierly, Assistant Director for EFA Project Space at lauren@efanyc.org.

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Jun
15
12:00 PM12:00

Event: Anhoek School presents WMYN 87.9 FM

Anhoek School, facilitated by Mary Walling Blackburn and Rafael Kelman, presents an afternoon coffee house in the exhibition space to accompany their sound project WMYN 87.9 FM. During the coffee house, several of WMYN’s contributors will sing/chant/ perform their songs live.

WMYN is a short-band, temporary radio station whose programming is composed of over 40 individual recordings of feminist texts or songs chosen by contributors, carried along by the radio hosts' desperate stream of fund-raising banter. The contributions represent something that each participant still semi-secretly clings to, or something they have never valued but wish to investigate. The project aims to resuscitate the shameful, the neglected, and the straight up beautiful and sift through the awkward, untenable and unseasonable for something potentially useful.

This event is organized in conjunction with the exhibtiion Failing to Levitate on view June 6 - July 3, 2014. Please click here for more information about the exhibition, and follow projects as they evolve at failingtolevitate.net.

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Jun
6
6:00 PM18:00

Event: Simultaneous Presence: Performances by Bill Dietz and Jen Rosenblit

Bill Dietz, Hypothetical Non-Attenuating Zuccotti Park Reflection Times

Jen Rosenblit, Scenarios for Hovering

Bill Dietz invites us to participate in the first of two spatial listening exercises (the second takes place on June 21st from 3-5 pm), Hypothetical Non-Attenuating Zuccotti Park Reflection Times. Using real instances from the people’s mic during occupy wall street, Dietz will facilitate a group rehearsal with attendees that translates the time it took for sound to travel between speaker and group into spatial relationships. The exercise will take place both in the gallery and on the street near EFA. 

In the first of a series of three performances, Jen Rosenblit’s improvisational movements in Scenarios for Hovering explore the idea of levitation as a way to understand the body’s relationship to the physical space and other works. She does not claim a space for her performance, but rather looks for ways to be present, to show up and decide, in the moment, how appearing responds to the contents of a space or does not. 

These performances are organized in conjunction with the exhibition Failing to Levitate on view June 6 - July 3, 2014. Please click here for more information about the exhibition, and follow projects as they evolve at failingtolevitate.net.

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May
16
7:00 PM19:00

Performance: (0) and ((), sometimes played in unison

  Image courtesy of Johnathan Holmok

Image courtesy of Johnathan Holmok

What sort of sound does a circle make? Early twentieth-century Russian painter Vasily Kandinsky, who is believed to have had synesthesia—the ability to "hear" colors, or experience physical sensations in response to visual or auditory stimuli—wrote that a circle could be "simultaneously loud and soft."

That theory will be tested in two upcoming sound performances at EFA Project Space. Johnathan Holmok and his ensemble—Jasmine Bloch-KrempelsAndrew DeJosephAlan Rigoletto, and Geoff Summers—will present a musical interpretation of Kandinsky's iconic 1926 painting, Several Circles, that will explore the work's cosmic nature through sound. The score  will utilize the position, color, and size of the circles to create an aural landscape reminiscent of the "music of the spheres." Throughout, musicians will have some liberty to "traverse the circles" and respond to each other improvisationally within set guidelines. The goal is to give listeners a multisensory experience that will help them further understand synesthesia and the relationship between art and music.

This performance is organized in conjunction with the exhibition "Several Circles," curated by Marco Antonini. For more information, please click here. The performance will begin at 7pm with a brief reception to follow.

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May
8
6:45 PM18:45

Event: Sensory Tour III by Georgia Krantz

Guggenheim educator and art historian Georgia Krantz specializes in descriptive and multi-sensory programs for people who are blind or have low vision, and adapts the utilized techniques for programs for sighted audiences. Her work grew out of recognizing the power of the mind's eye, or "the different ways visitors who are blind or have low vision were experiencing - were seeing - works of art." The potential for sighted audiences to learn from differently sighted audiences is significant. Krantz poses the question, "In a world where everyone sees differently anyway, how is it even possible to precisely reveal the work through the lens of a single viewer?"

Krantz will lead tours of "Several Circles" during which select works will be examined using different techniques adapted from her work with audiences who are blind. Props will be used and, for certain works, lights will be lowered. Visitors will have an opportunity to experience art through various senses, not just the privileged sense of sight. The aim is to sensitize observers to the diverse and nuanced means by which an augmented awareness of the sensorium capacitates an enhanced encounter with art. 

Due to the intimate and unique nature of these tours, capacity is limited to twelve people per group. Please RSVP to lauren@efanyc.org at least one day in advance . This tour is organized in conjunction with the exhibition "Several Circles" on view April 4 - May 17, 2014.

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May
1
6:45 PM18:45

Event: Sensory Tour II by Georgia Krantz

Guggenheim educator and art historian Georgia Krantz specializes in descriptive and multi-sensory programs for people who are blind or have low vision, and adapts the utilized techniques for programs for sighted audiences. Her work grew out of recognizing the power of the mind's eye, or "the different ways visitors who are blind or have low vision were experiencing - were seeing - works of art." The potential for sighted audiences to learn from differently sighted audiences is significant. Krantz poses the question, "In a world where everyone sees differently anyway, how is it even possible to precisely reveal the work through the lens of a single viewer?"

Krantz will lead tours of "Several Circles" during which select works will be examined using different techniques adapted from her work with audiences who are blind. Props will be used and, for certain works, lights will be lowered. Visitors will have an opportunity to experience art through various senses, not just the privileged sense of sight. The aim is to sensitize observers to the diverse and nuanced means by which an augmented awareness of the sensorium capacitates an enhanced encounter with art.

Due to the intimate and unique nature of these tours, capacity is limited to twelve people per group. Please RSVP to lauren@efanyc.org at least one day in advance . This tour is organized in conjunction with the exhibition "Several Circles" on view April 4 - May 17, 2014.

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Apr
24
6:45 PM18:45

Event: Sensory Tour I by Georgia Krantz

Guggenheim educator and art historian Georgia Krantz specializes in descriptive and multi-sensory programs for people who are blind or have low vision, and adapts the utilized techniques for programs for sighted audiences. Her work grew out of recognizing the power of the mind's eye, or "the different ways visitors who are blind or have low vision were experiencing - were seeing - works of art." The potential for sighted audiences to learn from differently sighted audiences is significant. Krantz poses the question, "In a world where everyone sees differently anyway, how is it even possible to precisely reveal the work through the lens of a single viewer?"

Krantz will lead tours of "Several Circles" during which select works will be examined using different techniques adapted from her work with audiences who are blind. Props will be used and, for certain works, lights will be lowered. Visitors will have an opportunity to experience art through various senses, not just the privileged sense of sight. The aim is to sensitize observers to the diverse and nuanced means by which an augmented awareness of the sensorium capacitates an enhanced encounter with art.

Due to the intimate and unique nature of these tours, capacity is limited to twelve people per group. Please RSVP to lauren@efanyc.org at least one day in advance . This tour is organized in conjunction with the exhibition "Several Circles" on view April 4 - May 17, 2014.

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Apr
4
6:00 PM18:00

Event: Several Circles Opening Reception

Artists: Joe Brittain, John Cage, Mia Goyette, Vladimir Havrilla, Rachel Higgins, Music Animation Machine (Stephen Malinowski), Mamiko Otsubo, Irgin Sena, Slobodan Stošić, Alina Tenser

Curated by Marco Antonini

This group exhibition takes its title from Vasily Kandinsky’s Several Circles, a 1926 painting that epitomizes Kandinsky’s co-optation of geometric form, a consequence of his exposure to Russian Constructivism and to the unfolding utopias that defined the cultural and social climate of the October Revolution. Geometry, for the author of Concerning the Spiritual in Art and Point and Line to Plane, was a way to access and communicate universal truths and feelings.

Kandinsky also believed there was a correspondence among forms, colors, and sounds. (“The circle,” he wrote in a letter to a friend, “is simultaneously loud and soft.”) This phenomenon is known as synesthesia, which is often deemed a neurological condition, and occurs when the stimulation of one sense leads to automatic, involuntary stimulation in another sense. An example of synesthesia is “hearing” colors. This exhibition takes this theory a step further. Recent scientific evidence indicates that the word synesthesia has been incorrectly used to describe connections among stimuli that are in fact induced by semantic representations. The artworks in “Several Circles” are aligned with the newer diagnosis of ideaesthesia: a phenomenon in which concepts evoke perception-like experiences. In other words, these concepts—such as a letter inducing color in the mind’s eye, as learned from refrigerator-magnet alphabets at an early age, or understanding “mu5ic” as “music,” by exchanging the letter “s” with the number “5”—trigger reactions that we believe we comprehend through our senses.

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Apr
4
12:00 PM12:00

Exhibition: Several Circles

 Mia Goyette, Antifreeze (Fortified Flower Vases), 2012-2014

Mia Goyette, Antifreeze (Fortified Flower Vases), 2012-2014

April 4 - May 17, 2014

 

Artists: Joe Brittain, John Cage, Mia Goyette, Vladimir Havrilla, Rachel Higgins, Music Animation Machine (Stephen Malinowski), Mamiko Otsubo, Irgin Sena, Slobodan Stošić, Alina Tenser

Curated by Marco Antonini

This group exhibition takes its title from Vasily Kandinsky’s Several Circles, a 1926 painting that epitomizes Kandinsky’s co-optation of geometric form, a consequence of his exposure to Russian Constructivism and to the unfolding utopias that defined the cultural and social climate of the October Revolution. Geometry, for the author of Concerning the Spiritual in Art and Point and Line to Plane, was a way to access and communicate universal truths and feelings.

Kandinsky also believed there was a correspondence among forms, colors, and sounds. (“The circle,” he wrote in a letter to a friend, “is simultaneously loud and soft.”) This phenomenon is known as synesthesia, which is often deemed a neurological condition, and occurs when the stimulation of one sense leads to automatic, involuntary stimulation in another sense. An example of synesthesia is “hearing” colors. This exhibition takes this theory a step further. Recent scientific evidence indicates that the word synesthesia has been incorrectly used to describe connections among stimuli that are in fact induced by semantic representations. The artworks in “Several Circles” are aligned with the newer diagnosis of ideaesthesia: a phenomenon in which concepts evoke perception-like experiences. In other words, these concepts—such as a letter inducing color in the mind’s eye, as learned from refrigerator-magnet alphabets at an early age, or understanding “mu5ic” as “music,” by exchanging the letter “s” with the number “5”—trigger reactions that we believe we comprehend through our senses.

If such perception-events are more about ideas and concepts—our own, or those we glean through interactions with different communities or society at large—to what extent would notions such as popular visual tropes, specific cultural references, or language itself tend to be associated with physical sensations? And how?

The works chosen for this exhibition connect not only sight, hearing, taste, touch, and scent, but reach out to a cosmos of “other” senses defined by the artists’—and our own—understanding of reality, and ways to make meaning of it. Apart from their ideaesthetic qualities, the works are unified by the recurrent use of the circular form, a trait d’union suggesting the possibility of a networked reading of the whole exhibition. Kandinsky’s talismanic Several Circles will appear in the exhibition in many different forms, serving as connective tissue among the objects and images on display.

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Mar
6
6:30 PM18:30

Event: "Tracking Transience" Lecture by Hasan Elahi

In an age where everything is archived and the need to delete is almost nonexistent, can we remain private anymore? Hasan Elahi will discuss the new normal of post 9/11 privacy and describe his experiences with FBI interrogations and his subsequent projects in the lecture, “Hiding in Plain Sight”. An erroneous tip called into law enforcement authorities in 2002 subjected Elahi to an intensive investigation by the FBI and after undergoing months of interrogations, he was finally cleared of suspicions.

After this harrowing experience, Elahi conceived “Tracking Transience” (http://trackingtransience.net) and opened just about every aspect of his life to the public. Predating the NSA’s PRISM surveillance program by nearly a decade, the project questions the consequences of living under constant surveillance and has continuously generated a database of imagery and locative information that tracks the artist and his points of transit in real-time. Although initially created for his FBI agent, the public can also monitor the artist’s communication records, banking transactions, and transportation logs along with various intelligence and government agencies who have been confirmed visiting his website.

This lecture is organized in conjunction with Distant Images, Local Positions. For more information, please email projectspace@efanyc.org.

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Feb
20
6:30 PM18:30

Performance: Bordernity: Part I of ... with Travis Leroy Southworth

A riveting performance about boredom and space-shifting; Southworth will reveal the "slow dance" of labor in connection to his practice, which involves the wadding and mashing of imagery from periodicals into three-dimensional sculptures. For his installation in Distant Images, Local Positions, titled The Deep Empty, pages from National Geographic Magazine were reshaped into new stalactite-like growths that slowly reach down from a ceiling, eventually falling on the ground.

Part instructional workshop, part performance; Southworth will discuss his interest in boredom and what he does while being bored. In past works, such as Boredom: A Literal History, he has torn pages from books and magazines, creating a series of sculptures by spitting the bits of paper through a straw onto a surface.

This event is for the young and old, the interesting and boring. Attendees can expect the following:

- Observe how a real pro shoots bits of paper through a straw.

- Learn the basics of spit wadding, from the benefits of certain paper types to choosing the appropriate straw.

- Gain a limited knowledge, most likely, based on biased ideas about the topic of boredom.

This workshop is organized in conjunction with current exhibition Distant Images, Local Positions. For more information, please email projectspace@efanyc.org or click here.

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Feb
8
2:00 PM14:00

Screening: "All watched over by Machines of Loving Grace" (2011)

Directed by: Adam Curtis, 180 minutes

In All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace (2011), Director Adam Curtis follows the development of cybernetic thinking through several parallel strands in three separate episodes: the profound effect of Ayn Rand and Milton Friedman's liberal individualism on the early techno-utopians of Silicon Valley, the adoption of Jay Forrester's cybernetic models by the ecology movement and the broader influence that cybernetic ideas had on the counterculture of the 1970s, and the development of gene-centered evolutionary biology using the concept of DNA as an information system governed by feedback mechanisms. All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace is a genealogy of the metaphysical structure that underlies both the dominant way of understanding the world today--from biology and ecology, to conflict resolution and crisis management--and our experience of the world, mediated as it is in almost all its details through the complex adaptive system that is the internet.

Adam Curtis (b. 1955) is an English filmmaker primarily known for a series of documentaries he produced for the BBC between 2002 and 2011 and his recent spectacular collaboration with trip-hop duo Massive Attack that has been performed in Manchester and New York. Curtis's films usually begin with some contingent encounter from which a complex historical argument is then woven, creating interconnections and linkages between events. Although his documentaries vary in subject matter, a central theme often comes into play: the use and abuse of power and its role in society.

Film running time is 180 minutes with a brief intermission. $5 suggested donation at the door. Space is limited, RSVP is required. Please RSVP to lauren@efanyc.org by Friday, February 7.

This event is organized in conjunction with the exhibition Distant Images, Local Positions. Special thanks to Spectacle Theater and staff for hosting the event. 

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Jan
24
12:00 PM12:00

EXHIBITION: DISTANT IMAGES, LOCAL POSITIONS

 AnnieLaurie Erickson, 29°59'23.45"N, 90°25'19.35"W (Norco), 2013

AnnieLaurie Erickson, 29°59'23.45"N, 90°25'19.35"W (Norco), 2013

Distant Images, Local Positions

January 24 - March 8, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, January 24, 6:00-8:00pm

Artists: Haseeb Ahmed and Daniel Baird, Hasan Elahi, AnnieLaurie Erickson, Regina Mamou, Mary Mattingly, Trevor Paglen, Travis LeRoy Southworth, Scott Patrick Wiener

Curated by: Wafaa Bilal

What controls geography? Photographs, ultimately and they do so without neutrality. Our understanding of geography from afar is constructed in a fragmented and subjective way, via photographic imagery. This gives the impression of closeness, but the illusion alienates both the place being seen and the viewer. As a result, we become complacent in the universe of appearances, comforted by the knowledge that what is depicted is now known. But the camera can only show us an apparition, not an actual place. Both the technology and the resulting images are mobile–shot and sent out through various media so that the represented geographies are totally unstable, despite our culture’s desperation to fix them as fact to paper, screens, and the like. Using technological imagery as their point of departure, the artists here propose unstable positions that question and subvert the photographic construction of visual power.

In Has the World Already Been Made? (2012) Ahmed and Baird act as archaeological conservators and use sculptural means to produce molds (negatives) that result in a fragmented installation of casts (positives) to bring together geographically disparate locations in one space. Many of the resulting forms are recognizable, some not, but all carry with them a mark of familiarity that is difficult to shake free. Elahi’s video installation Concordance (scheduled for January 2014), which he produced for this exhibition, examines how the genre of landscape has evolved in a post-9/11 world where the subject is unsure whether or not they are the watched or the watcher. Erickson’s Slow Light series (2013-Present) addresses the phenomenon of afterimages by using cameras equipped with handmade artificial retinas. These images focus on the oil refineries of Louisiana, transforming ubiquitous yet forbidden landmarks into ghostly, mysterious constellations of light. For the installation Proposed Vortex (2013) Mamou uses photographic practices to explore the visual appropriation of metaphysical space by those that would use it to fulfill their own spiritual desires. In After Candide (2008-11) Mattingly photographs tourist activities then digitally combines them with collected images of disaster sites masquerading as industrial landscapes. Southworth is another story, so to speak. In recent sculptural works on boredom he calls “spitwad stalactites” (2009-Present) various magazines are wadded up and spat at walls and ceilings. In The Deep Empty (scheduled for January 2014), an installation produced for this show, he brings together many places by using his body as material to transform pages from the popular magazine National Geographic into a grotto-like installation. Paglen’s ongoing Untitled (Drones) series uses the fact of machinic vision by airborne military surveillance technologies as his subject. There is power play in this—by staring at these “seeing-machines” against the stillness of color fields, one recognizes the 21st century aesthetic condition of perpetual seeing and being-seen. For the ongoing project Landscape Acquisition (2012-Present), Wiener combines manipulated images from the history of military surveillance with radio-controlled (RC) drone technology to survey picturesque landscapes.

About the Curator:

Iraqi-born artist Wafaa Bilal, an Assistant Arts Professor at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, is known internationally for his online performative and interactive works. In 3rdi (2010–2011), Bilal had a camera surgically implanted on the back of his head to spontaneously transmit images to the web 24 hours a day—a statement on surveillance, the mundane and the things we leave behind. Bilal’s 2010 work ...And Counting similarly used his own body as a medium. His back was tattooed with a map of Iraq and dots representing Iraqi and US casualties—the Iraqis in invisible ink visible only under a black light. Bilal's 2007 installation, Domestic Tension, also addressed the Iraq war. Bilal spent a month in a Chicago gallery with a paintball gun that people could shoot at him over the Internet. The Chicago Tribune called it "one of the sharpest works of political art to be seen in a long time" and named him 2008 Artist of the Year. Bilal's work is constantly informed by the experience of fleeing his homeland and existing simultaneously in two worlds—his home in the "comfort zone" of the U.S. and his consciousness of the "conflict zone" in Iraq. Bilal graduated with a BFA from the University of New Mexico and obtained an MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. 

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