Collective Grief: The Design, Politics, and Future of Memorials
May
2
6:30 PM18:30

Collective Grief: The Design, Politics, and Future of Memorials

A panel discussion co-presented by Reimagine End of Life.

RSVP at our Eventbrite event.

While grief is a personal feeling, memorials are a key way in which our society collectively mourns. This panel discussion will consider the different forms that such public tributes can take and the politics of who gets to be commemorated. What new memorials are being created to fill out the landscape of a death-denying country dotted with Confederate statues? What future ones do we need? The four panelists, Anthony Goicolea, Melinda Hunt, Karla Rothstein, and Elizabeth Velazquez, have all experimented with what a memorial can be, bringing their creative energies to bear on an old practice. They will speak about their work and then engage in a conversation about who, what, and how we collectively remember. Moderated by Jillian Steinhauer.

Panelist Bios:

Goicolea is a New York based multi-disciplinary artist who established his career in the late 1990s with a series of provocative self-portraits. His work ranges from photography, sculpture, and video, to multi-layered paintings on Mylar and large-scale installations. His work is held in many public collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the Museum of Modern Art, as well as the Hirshorn Museum in D.C., the North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh; 21C Museum in Louisville KY, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art in NY. He recently unveiled the LGBT Memorial in the located in the Hudson River Park at West 12th Street in NYC. 

Melinda Hunt, president 2018-2020, is an interdisciplinary artist and founding director of the Hart Island Project. She holds an MFA from the Yale School of Art (1985), film (200), and electronic art (2011). She received Canada Council Interarts Awards (2008, 2009, 2017, 2018) and a NYSCA/NYFA Fellowship in 2017. She directed the development of Traveling Cloud Museum produce in collaboration with Studio AIRPORT and Inspire Innovation in the Netherlands. She has recently launched a creative initiative to recover the identities of AIDS victims buried on Hart Island.

Karla Rothstein is the founder and director of Columbia University’s DeathLAB, a cross-disciplinary research and design initiative housed at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation where she has taught design studios for twenty years. An 8-month solo exhibition in 2018-19 at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa Japan, DeathLAB: Democratizing Death, featured the lab’s research, design proposals, and interviews. Rothstein’s work at DeathLAB has been supported by the MacDowell Colony, Columbia’s Earth Institute, The Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life, The Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Art Omi, Kanazawa 21C, and Columbia GSAPP. Rothstein is a practicing architect, co-founder and design director at LATENT Productions. Current building projects include 25 units of affordable housing in Brooklyn NY, remediation of brownfield conditions and the revivification of a 9-acre, 240,000 SF former cotton-spinning campus in the Berkshires, and a meandering vertical urban oasis for a private client.

Elizabeth Velazquez creates mixed-media sculptural works, installations and rituals. Elizabeth currently lives in Queens, NY. She is one of the founding members of SEQAA (Southeast Queens Artist Alliance), whose current project, a mobile zine cart/mobile workshop space, received funding from a QCA grant. Ms. Velazquez was awarded a 6-month residency at Cigar Factory in LIC, culminating in a two-person show in that very unique space. Ms. Velazquez was a participating artist in Reimagine End of Life for which she created a ritual in memory of Rose Butler and those who remain buried below Washington Square Park. Elizabeth will be traveling to Jerusalem for the month of July as part of the apexart International Fellowship.

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Good Grief, with Todd Shalom
Apr
11
6:30 PM18:30

Good Grief, with Todd Shalom

Todd Shalom will facilitate a participatory music event, "Good Grief." The evening will begin with participants listening to and playing pre-recorded songs that relate to grief as a way of sharing their stories with the group. The conversation will focus on the feelings that different songs evoke and flow from there, likely moving toward other themes. There's no pressure to participate nor is there any prep work to do beforehand. "Good Grief" presents an opportunity to practice intimate listening with people you've likely never met.

This event holds 8 people. To RSVP, please email: info@toddshalom.com


Todd Shalom is the founder and director of Elastic City, a nonprofit organization that produced over 200 participatory walks and events between 2010 and 2016. In collaboration with performance artist/director Niegel Smith, Todd conceives and stages interactive performances in public and private environments. Todd has been a faculty member at Pratt Institute and is currently teaching at the School of Visual Arts. His work has been presented by Abrons Art Center, Brooklyn Museum, Columbia University GSAPP, Des Moines Art Center, The Invisible Dog, ISSUE Project Room, MIT List Visual Arts Center, The Museum of Modern Art, The New Museum, P.S. 122, and Stanford University. Todd has been an artist-in-residence at Akiyoshidai International Art Village (Japan), Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts (Omaha), Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and SHIFT (EFA Project Space).


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Artist Talk With Edgar Heap Of Birds
Mar
30
2:00 PM14:00

Artist Talk With Edgar Heap Of Birds

Edgar-prints.jpg

Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds (Cheyenne/Arapaho) will speak about his set of prints in the exhibition, "Dead Indian Stories," which are a response to the conditions of life for Indigenous peoples in the United States. The artist will discuss some of the many issues that Native people face today—including poverty, deficient educational opportunities, high rates of suicide, and lack of political representation—and how his artwork pays homage to the ongoing perseverance of Native nations.

RSVP Here via EventBrite.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Hock E Aye VI Edgar Heap Of Birds is an artist and an advocate for Indigenous communities worldwide. His work includes multidisciplinary forms of public art messages, large-scale drawings, Neuf Series acrylic paintings, prints, works in glass, and monumental porcelain enamel on steel outdoor sculpture. While representing Indigenous communities, his art focuses first on social justice and on the personal freedom to live within the tribal circle as an expressive individual. Heap of Birds’ work was shown in the 2007 Venice Biennale and has been exhibited at some of the most renowned institutions in the world. In 2012, he was named a USA Ford Fellow and in 2014 was honored as a Distinguished Alumni from the University of Kansas. Now retired from teaching at the University of Oklahoma after 30 years of service, he continues to serve there as professor emeritus.

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Opening reception, with a performance by ​Jaamil Olawale Kosoko
Mar
27
6:00 PM18:00

Opening reception, with a performance by ​Jaamil Olawale Kosoko

Opening Reception for In the Presence of Absence with a performance by Jaamil Olawale Kosoko - Chameleon (The EFA Installments).

Chameleon is a performance project created by Jaamil Olawale Kosoko that examines the shapeshifting, illegible, and fugitive realities of Black diasporan people. Using live feed and augmented reality media with complexity theory (the study of adaptive survivalist strategies inside complex networks or environments) as a choreographic device, this work explores how minoritarian communities record and affirm their existence through collaborative actions and protests that archive personal freedom narratives as a way to subvert culturally charged fields of systemic oppression, loss, and erasure.

RSVP Here.

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Is It Our Anger That Makes Us So Beautiful? a live performance by Amelia Bande
Mar
9
4:00 PM16:00

Is It Our Anger That Makes Us So Beautiful? a live performance by Amelia Bande

A collective rehearsal, glowing capsules of intimacy. Our corrugated
hunger will jump from the screen to the stage. Choreographed emojis
and memes. Sad songs performed live to send later via text message. Do
we live inside a miracle? 

Presented in partnership with Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory.

About the presenter:

Amelia Bande is a Brooklyn-based writer and performer from Chile. Her solo and collaborative work has been shown at Artists Space, The Poetry Project, Pratt Manhattan Gallery, Storm King Arts Center, Tang Museum, MoMA Library, MIX NYC, Abrons Arts Center, Participant Inc., BOFFO Performance Festival, and more. She has been an artist in residence at WORM Filmwerkplaats, The Shandaken Project and Yaddo. She is co-editor of Critical Correspondence, an online publication of Movement Research. Her chapbook The Clothes We Wear was published by Belladonna in 2017.

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Collective Strategies for Reparative Care: A Panel Discussion
Mar
2
3:00 PM15:00

Collective Strategies for Reparative Care: A Panel Discussion

Collective Strategies for Reparative Care: A panel discussion with  OlaRonke Akinmowo (creator, The Free Black Women’s Library), Kevin Gotkin (artist, activist, and professor), Ted Kerr (writer and organizer, What Would an HIV Doula Do?), Lana Lin (filmmaker, scholar, author of Freud’s Jaw and Other Lost Objects: Fractured Subjectivity in the Face of Cancer, 2017). A reception will follow the event. Presented in partnership with NYU Center for Disability Studies.

About the presenters:

OlaRonke Akinmowo is a Black feminist scholar, librarian and interdisciplinary artist who primarily works in collage, paper printmaking, and installation. She is also a set decorator, yoga teacher, and mom. Her work is informed by ritual, research, and identity. She aims to provide alternative contexts around race, gender and class, as well as examine the sacred aspects of history and culture. She sees life, nature and archives as necessary and sacred. In 2014 she birthed The Free Black Women’s Library, a public art project that centers and celebrates Black women writers, artists and activists. This biblio installation currently holds a collection of over one thousand books written by Black women, and features workshops, readings, performance, film screenings and critical conversation. It has been installed at the Studio Museum in Harlem, MOCADA Museum, Weeksville Heritage Center, Concord Baptist Church, National Black Theater and Nurture Art Gallery. Ola is a recipient of multiple grants and fellowships from varying organizations including the Brooklyn Arts Council, the Awesome FoundationCulture PushThe Laundromat Project and The Robert Blackburn Printmaking Studio

Kevin Gotkin’s work combines research, artistry, and activism. He studies forms of endurance and the ritualization of ableism in American culture. His current book project considers the histories of the telethon, danceathon, walkathon, and hackathon in the U.S. His previous research has been published in the IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, Disability Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Video Ethnography, and Porn Studies. Kevin’s teaching interests include media studies methodologies, identity politics, disability theory, and media production. In 2015, he won the university-wide Penn Prize in Excellence in Graduate Teaching from the University of Pennsylvania.  In 2016 with Simi Linton, he co-founded the Disability/Arts/NYC (DANT), an activist organization that seeks to advance the aesthetics and artistry of disability in NYC. This work has been funded by the Mertz Gilmore Foundation and the Cultural Agenda Fund administered by The New York Community Trust. The activism can be seen reflected in the city’s first cultural plan, CreateNYC, and in public programming around the city, including “An Etiology of Omission” at The Whitney Museum in the fall of 2017. 

Canadian born Theodore Kerr is a Brooklyn based writer, organizer and artist whose work focuses on HIV/AIDS, community, and culture. Kerr is a founding member of the What Would An HIV Doula Do? collective, a community of people committed to better implicating community within the ongoing response to HIV/AIDS. Their work has been featured in The Body,  Art in America and POZ magazine. With Aldrin Valdez, Kerr is a co-founder of Foundational Sharing, a performance and publishing platform. Since 2013, Valdez and Kerr have hosted 5 Foundational Sharing salons, and been invited to produce the event with the Bowery Poetry Club, CUNY, Visual AIDS and Queer Art Mentorship. Creating postcards, posters, stickers, and collages, Kerr's art practice is about bringing together pop culture, photography and text to create fun and meaningful shareable ephemera and images. Collaboration is a big part of Kerr's art practice. He has made work with Zachary Ayotte, L.J. Roberts, Chaplain Christopher Jones, Niknaz Tavakolian, Bridget de Gersigny, Malene Dam and others. He has been in exhibitions curated by Kris Nuzzi, Sur Rodney (Sur), Danny Orendorff and others. Two of his works, in collaboration with Shawn Torres and Jun Bae, are part of DePaul Art Gallery's permanent collection.  

Lana Lin is a filmmaker, artist, and writer whose creative practice concerns embodied vulnerabilities. She has produced a body of experimental films and videos that interrogate the politics of identity and cultural translation through attention to the formal capacities and historical contingencies of moving image media. Since 2001, she has focused on collaborative multi-disciplinary research-based projects (as Lin + Lam) that examine the construction of history and collective memory. Lin’s works have been screened and exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art and Whitney Museum, NY, Stedelijk Museum, Gasworks, London, UnionDocs, Brooklyn, Oberhausen Film Festival, Taiwan International Documentary Festival, and China-Taipei Film Archive, among others. She has received awards from the Javits Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, Jerome Foundation, New York State Council on the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts, and has been a fellow at the MacDowell Colony, Civitella Ranieri, and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics. Lin is the author of Freud’s Jaw and Other Lost Objects: Fractured Subjectivity in the Face of Cancer,which examines the psychic effects of cancer through studies of three important creative and intellectual figures: Sigmund Freud, Audre Lorde, and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick. She recently completed a feature-length personal documentary that “re-visions” Black feminist poet Audre Lorde’s 1980 memoir, The Cancer Journals. An Associate Professor in the School of Media Studies at the New School, Lin is currently a fellow of the New School's India-China Institute.

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ICI hosts CURRICULUM with Becca Albee, Macarena Gómez-Barris, Stamatina Gregory, Jeanne Vaccaro and Sarah Zapata
Feb
25
6:30 PM18:30

ICI hosts CURRICULUM with Becca Albee, Macarena Gómez-Barris, Stamatina Gregory, Jeanne Vaccaro and Sarah Zapata

PLEASE NOTE THIS EVENT IS HELD AT ICI:
401 Broadway, Suite 1620
New York, NY 10013 

Join ICI for a conversation about the EFA Project Space exhibition CURRICULUM with curators Stamatina Gregory and Jeanne Vacarro, artists Becca Albee and Sarah Zapata and scholar Macarena Gomez-Barris. In a format redolent of consciousness raising groups and spurred on by key questions from each participant we’ll be workshopping ideas central to the exhibition’s inception: the relationship between curatorial practice and pedagogy, with a focus on structural critiques of self-help, fostering group intimacy, and thinking through decolonial thought and aesthetics.

The exhibition CURRICULUM, at EFA through March 16, reimagines collective study outside of cultural institutions and creates pathways for resistance by asking the questions: What would a curriculum for collective study and political action look and feel like? Can simply being present together be a form of learning, a way of transforming one another? What is recuperable from decades past? What can we do that we have not yet done?

The practices and research taken up in CURRICULUM connect with the ideas and questions taken up by several of ICI’s programs internationally, most notably Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. with ICI’s investment in DIY culture, archives, hapticality and a capacity for queering our everyday. This event intends to introduce commonly engaged practitioners in New York through their respective elected affinities to consider and process current global and regional dynamics cultural producers from different fields are grappling with in the context of New York.
This event is free and open to the public. To attend, please RSVP here

ICI
401 Broadway, Suite 1620
New York, NY 10013 

This event is accessible to people with mobility disabilities. Please contact ICI for additional accessibility needs.

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The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions
Feb
24
2:00 PM14:00

The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions

The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions: a discussion of Eloquent Rage by Brittney Cooper.

About the presenter:

OlaRonke Akinmowo is a Black feminist scholar, librarian and interdisciplinary artist who primarily works in collage, paper printmaking, and installation. She is also a set decorator, yoga teacher, and mom. Her work is informed by ritual, research, and identity. She aims to provide alternative contexts around race, gender and class, as well as examine the sacred aspects of history and culture. She sees life, nature and archives as necessary and sacred. 

 In 2014 she birthed The Free Black Women’s Library, a public art project that centers and celebrates Black women writers, artists and activists. This biblio installation currently holds a collection of over one thousand books written by Black women, and features workshops, readings, performance, film screenings and critical conversation. It has been installed at the Studio Museum in Harlem, MOCADA Museum, Weeksville Heritage Center, Concord Baptist Church, National Black Theater and Nurture Art Gallery. Ola is a recipient of multiple grants and fellowships from varying organizations including the Brooklyn Arts Council, the Awesome FoundationCulture PushThe Laundromat Project and The Robert Blackburn Printmaking Studio

Support the growth of the library through the Patreon page, and follow its progress on Instagram, Facebook and Tumblr.

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Letting Go: A reading by scholar and critic Jennifer Doyle
Feb
15
6:00 PM18:00

Letting Go: A reading by scholar and critic Jennifer Doyle

Letting Go describes the experience of being stalked by a student, and offers an extended reflection on the psychic costs of living with harassment.

About the presenter:

Jennifer Doyle is a Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside. Currently, she is working on a collection of essays on art and sport. She is also writing about paranoia, harassment and the workplace. In 2015, she curated Nao Bustamante: Soldadera, for the Vincent Price Art Museum. She is also the curator of “The Tip of Her Tongue,” a feminist performance art series presented by The Broad Museum, in Los Angeles. She is a member of the Board of Directors at Human Resources, Los Angeles, a space dedicated to performance-based and interdisciplinary experimental art.


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The Free Black Women's Library Literary Sessions
Feb
13
6:00 PM18:00

The Free Black Women's Library Literary Sessions

The Free Black Women's Library Literary Sessions: February - Honoring Alice Walker and Audre Lorde.

The Literary Sessions honor Black women authors born in that month. Guests are welcome to come and listen to readings of these author’s work and possibly be inspired to write, draw and create what they feel based on the reading or the prompts offered.

About the presenter:

OlaRonke Akinmowo is a Black feminist scholar, librarian and interdisciplinary artist who primarily works in collage, paper printmaking, and installation. She is also a set decorator, yoga teacher, and mom. Her work is informed by ritual, research, and identity. She aims to provide alternative contexts around race, gender and class, as well as examine the sacred aspects of history and culture. She sees life, nature and archives as necessary and sacred. 

 In 2014 she birthed The Free Black Women’s Library, a public art project that centers and celebrates Black women writers, artists and activists. This biblio installation currently holds a collection of over one thousand books written by Black women, and features workshops, readings, performance, film screenings and critical conversation. It has been installed at the Studio Museum in Harlem, MOCADA Museum, Weeksville Heritage Center, Concord Baptist Church, National Black Theater and Nurture Art Gallery. Ola is a recipient of multiple grants and fellowships from varying organizations including the Brooklyn Arts Council, the Awesome FoundationCulture PushThe Laundromat Project and The Robert Blackburn Printmaking Studio

Support the growth of the library through the Patreon page, and follow its progress on Instagram, Facebook and Tumblr.

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The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions
Jan
27
2:00 PM14:00

The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions

The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions: a discussion of TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NEGRO GIRLS by Camille Acker.

About the presenter:

OlaRonke Akinmowo is a Black feminist scholar, librarian and interdisciplinary artist who primarily works in collage, paper printmaking, and installation. She is also a set decorator, yoga teacher, and mom. Her work is informed by ritual, research, and identity. She aims to provide alternative contexts around race, gender and class, as well as examine the sacred aspects of history and culture. She sees life, nature and archives as necessary and sacred. 

 In 2014 she birthed The Free Black Women’s Library, a public art project that centers and celebrates Black women writers, artists and activists. This biblio installation currently holds a collection of over one thousand books written by Black women, and features workshops, readings, performance, film screenings and critical conversation. It has been installed at the Studio Museum in Harlem, MOCADA Museum, Weeksville Heritage Center, Concord Baptist Church, National Black Theater and Nurture Art Gallery. Ola is a recipient of multiple grants and fellowships from varying organizations including the Brooklyn Arts Council, the Awesome FoundationCulture PushThe Laundromat Project and The Robert Blackburn Printmaking Studio

Support the growth of the library through the Patreon page, and follow its progress on Instagram, Facebook and Tumblr.

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Curatorial Walk-Through for Curriculum
Jan
16
5:00 PM17:00