Opening Reception for Museum Without Building
Aug
28
6:00 PM18:00

Opening Reception for Museum Without Building

EFA Project Space welcomes you to join us for the Opening Reception for Museum Without Building, a project by Yona Friedman. This exhibition is a production of EFA Project Space in collaboration with CNEAI= and Le Petit Versailles. The organizers and some artists will be present with drinks and light refreshments served.

View Event →

Closing Reception And Publication Launch
Aug
3
6:00 PM18:00

Closing Reception And Publication Launch

Join EFA Project Space and our 2018/2019 SHIFT Residents as we celebrate the end of their exhibition Temporary Island and the release of the concurrent publication. Artists will be present to talk about their work and the publication will be available for a small donation. Light refreshments will be served.

FAMILIES & ACCESSIBILITY
EFA Project Space is committed to nurturing an intergenerational environment and we encourage 'kid noise' at our events. Please notify us of any accessibility needs by Facebook Messenger, email projectspace@efanyc.org, or give us a call at (212) 563-5855 x 229.

Image: No Man Is An Island, But This Queen Is, Matthew de Leon (SHIFT Resident), 2018-19.

View Event →
Temporary Island: Artmaking and Caregiving Roundtable
Jul
24
6:00 PM18:00

Temporary Island: Artmaking and Caregiving Roundtable

unnamed.jpg

Alicia Ehni, Game of Balance #3, 2017

SHIFT Residency addresses the unique work-life challenges facing a niche of artists who work over 35 hours per week in support of other artists (as arts administrators, curators, educators, and advocates), many of whom are caregivers. How can initiatives of the cultural sector (residencies, art education, exhibition and programming spaces) be re-tooled to better support and advocate for artists who are caregivers?

Join EFA Project Space's SHIFT Residents for a roundtable discussion on caregiver advocacy in the arts. Visitors are encouraged to actively participate during the roundtable and share thoughts or questions alongside guest respondents Juliana Driever, Alicia Ehni, Natalia Nakazawa, and Maya Valladares, who will co-moderate the discussion.


GUEST RESPONDENTS

Juliana Driever
Curator & Writer
Co-Curator of The Let Down Reflex (2016) at EFA Project Space, an exhibition that attempts to recognize the complexities of parenting in the art world, and asks if a better alternative for families can exist.

Alicia Ehni
SHIFT Resident
Program Officer, NYFA
www.aliciaehni.com

Natalia Nakazawa
Artist
Assistant Director, EFA Studios Program
www.natalianakazawa.com

Maya Valladares
SHIFT Resident
Associate Director, Sewing, Textiles & Soft Construction at Parsons Making Center
www.mayavalladares.com


FAMILIES & ACCESSIBILITY
EFA Project Space is committed to nurturing an intergenerational environment and we encourage 'kid noise' at our events. An audio recording of the talk will be available for those who will not attend an early evening event upon request. Please notify us of any accessibility needs by Facebook Messenger, email projectspace@efanyc.org, or give us a call at (212) 563-5855 x 229.

View Event →
In the Presence of Absence: Exhibition Closing and Publication Launch
May
11
2:00 PM14:00

In the Presence of Absence: Exhibition Closing and Publication Launch

On the last day of In the Presence of Absence, we will mark its passing with a series of readings on the themes of grief and loss.

Writers and artists Raha Behnam, Erica Cardwell, TR Ericsson, Michelle García, Diane Mehta, and curator Jillian Steinhauer will share original work on grief and loss.

The event will also celebrate the release of the exhibition’s accompanying publication, designed by Partner & Partners, with essays by Michelle GarcíaJessica Lynne, and Jillian Steinhauer.

As at a wake or a shiva call, there will be refreshments and a chance to mingle and reflect.  Please join us.

About the Readers:

Raha Behnam is an Iranian-born, Canadian-raised, US-based artist; a first-generation immigrant to occupied Indigenous land. She is the daughter of Iranian artists, Darab Behnam Shabahang and Mahvash Vatankhahi. Her current work investigates the breakages and absences in knowing in regards to culture, belonging, and connection, particularly around her Iranian lineage. Raha is concerned with systems and practices for collective healing, and engaged in liberation work through community-based counseling. Last year, Raha and collaborator Mollie Moorhead launched Heirloom, a zine containing reflections on cultural loss and healing by twelve contributors.

Her performance work has been presented at venues including Danspace Project, The Knockdown Center, and Performance Studies international 2017 conference. She is a member of the Future Historical Society, lead by Yazmany Arboleda - a collective that honors the legacy of Ft. Greene, Brooklyn residents; and also a member of the Undoing & Doing Collective, instigated by Lorene Bouboushian.

Erica N. Cardwell is a writer, culture critic, and radical educator based in New York. She received her MFA in Creative Nonfiction from Sarah Lawrence College and is a 2015 LAMBDA Fellow in Nonfiction. Erica teaches in the English Department at the Borough of Manhattan Community College (CUNY) and a Social Justice capstone for the Gural Scholars Program at The New School. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The Believer, Hyperallergic, The Brooklyn Rail, Rewire, Contact Sheet 187: Light Work Annual, Green Mountains Review and elsewhere. Erica is on the editorial board of Radical Teacher Journal. She lives in Brooklyn with her wife Zhaleh and their turtle, Smiley Mousa. www.erica-cardwell.com

TR Ericsson’s work has appeared in solo and group exhibitions in the United States and abroad including those with Kunsthalle Marcel Duchamp, Switzerland; Francis M. Naumann Fine Art, NY; Paul Kasmin Gallery, NY, and Harlan Levey Projects, Brussels. Ericsson’s work is in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Yale University Library (Special Collections) and the Progressive Art Collection as well numerous private collections.

“Crackle & Drag,” a ruthlessly honest, yet tender portrayal of his mother has been the subject of a solo exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Art and an award-winning monograph published by Yale University Press (2015), as well as a solo exhibition at the Everson Museum of Art (2017).

Michelle García is a journalist and essayist. She is a current Soros Equality fellow and Dobie Paisano writer-in-residence. She is working on a book about borders. She is a frequent contributor to the Oxford American and Guernica. Her work has appeared in, Guardian, The New York Times, The Baffler and numerous other publications. She reported from the New York bureau of The Washington Post and she is a former Texas correspondent for Columbia Journalism Review. Member of Pen America. She is based in Texas and New York City and you can find her at www.michellegarciainc.com and on twitter at @pistoleraprod.

Diane Mehta’s debut poetry collection, Forest with Castanets, came out this March. Born in Frankfurt, Germany, and raised in Bombay and New Jersey, Mehta studied with Derek Walcott and Robert Pinsky in the nineties and has been an editor at PEN America’s Glossolalia, Guernica and A Public Space. Her book about writing poetry was published by Barnes & Noble books in 2005. She is finishing a historical novel set in 1946 India and a collection of essays. She lives in Brooklyn.

Jillian Steinhauer is a journalist and editor living in Brooklyn, NY. Her writing has appeared recently in the New York Times, The New Republic, The Nation, and The Art Newspaper, among other publications. She won the 2014 Best Art Reporting Award from the U.S. chapter of the International Association of Art Critics for her work at Hyperallergic, where she was formerly a senior editor. She writes mainly about art and politics, or the intersection of art and the world, but has been known to go on at length about cats, as in an essay commissioned for the 2015 book Cat Is Art Spelled Wrong (Coffee House Press). She received her master's in Cultural Reporting and Criticism from NYU.

View Event →
Collective Grief: The Design, Politics, and Future of Memorials
May
2
6:30 PM18:30

Collective Grief: The Design, Politics, and Future of Memorials

A panel discussion co-presented by Reimagine End of Life.

RSVP at our Eventbrite event.

While grief is a personal feeling, memorials are a key way in which our society collectively mourns. This panel discussion will consider the different forms that such public tributes can take and the politics of who gets to be commemorated. What new memorials are being created to fill out the landscape of a death-denying country dotted with Confederate statues? What future ones do we need? The four panelists, Anthony Goicolea, Melinda Hunt, Karla Rothstein, and Elizabeth Velazquez, have all experimented with what a memorial can be, bringing their creative energies to bear on an old practice. They will speak about their work and then engage in a conversation about who, what, and how we collectively remember. Moderated by Jillian Steinhauer.

Event Image:
DeathLAB: Democratizing Death, Perpetual Constellation sakura viewing, Tokyo.

Image courtesy of Columbia University GSAPP DeathLAB and LATENT Productions

Panelist Bios:

Anthony Goicolea is a New York based multi-disciplinary artist who established his career in the late 1990s with a series of provocative self-portraits. His work ranges from photography, sculpture, and video, to multi-layered paintings on Mylar and large-scale installations. His work is held in many public collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the Museum of Modern Art, as well as the Hirshorn Museum in D.C., the North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh; 21C Museum in Louisville KY, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art in NY. He recently unveiled the LGBT Memorial in the located in the Hudson River Park at West 12th Street in NYC. 

Melinda Hunt is an interdisciplinary artist and founding director of the Hart Island Project. She holds an MFA from the Yale School of Art (1985), film (200), and electronic art (2011). She received Canada Council Interarts Awards (2008, 2009, 2017, 2018) and a NYSCA/NYFA Fellowship in 2017. She directed the development of Traveling Cloud Museum produce in collaboration with Studio AIRPORT and Inspire Innovation in the Netherlands. She has recently launched a creative initiative to recover the identities of AIDS victims buried on Hart Island.

Karla Rothstein is the founder and director of Columbia University’s DeathLAB, a cross-disciplinary research and design initiative housed at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation where she has taught design studios for twenty years. An 8-month solo exhibition in 2018-19 at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa Japan, DeathLAB: Democratizing Death, featured the lab’s research, design proposals, and interviews. Rothstein’s work at DeathLAB has been supported by the MacDowell Colony, Columbia’s Earth Institute, The Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life, The Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Art Omi, Kanazawa 21C, and Columbia GSAPP. Rothstein is a practicing architect, co-founder and design director at LATENT Productions. Current building projects include 25 units of affordable housing in Brooklyn NY, remediation of brownfield conditions and the revivification of a 9-acre, 240,000 SF former cotton-spinning campus in the Berkshires, and a meandering vertical urban oasis for a private client.

Elizabeth Velazquez creates mixed-media sculptural works, installations and rituals. Elizabeth currently lives in Queens, NY. She is one of the founding members of SEQAA (Southeast Queens Artist Alliance), whose current project, a mobile zine cart/mobile workshop space, received funding from a QCA grant. Ms. Velazquez was awarded a 6-month residency at Cigar Factory in LIC, culminating in a two-person show in that very unique space. Ms. Velazquez was a participating artist in Reimagine End of Life for which she created a ritual in memory of Rose Butler and those who remain buried below Washington Square Park. Elizabeth will be traveling to Jerusalem for the month of July as part of the apexart International Fellowship.

View Event →
Good Grief, with Todd Shalom
Apr
11
6:30 PM18:30

Good Grief, with Todd Shalom

Todd Shalom will facilitate a participatory music event, "Good Grief." The evening will begin with participants listening to and playing pre-recorded songs that relate to grief as a way of sharing their stories with the group. The conversation will focus on the feelings that different songs evoke and flow from there, likely moving toward other themes. There's no pressure to participate nor is there any prep work to do beforehand. "Good Grief" presents an opportunity to practice intimate listening with people you've likely never met.

This event holds 8 people. To RSVP, please email: info@toddshalom.com


Todd Shalom is the founder and director of Elastic City, a nonprofit organization that produced over 200 participatory walks and events between 2010 and 2016. In collaboration with performance artist/director Niegel Smith, Todd conceives and stages interactive performances in public and private environments. Todd has been a faculty member at Pratt Institute and is currently teaching at the School of Visual Arts. His work has been presented by Abrons Art Center, Brooklyn Museum, Columbia University GSAPP, Des Moines Art Center, The Invisible Dog, ISSUE Project Room, MIT List Visual Arts Center, The Museum of Modern Art, The New Museum, P.S. 122, and Stanford University. Todd has been an artist-in-residence at Akiyoshidai International Art Village (Japan), Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts (Omaha), Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and SHIFT (EFA Project Space).


View Event →
Artist Talk With Edgar Heap Of Birds
Mar
30
2:00 PM14:00

Artist Talk With Edgar Heap Of Birds

Edgar-prints.jpg

Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds (Cheyenne/Arapaho) will speak about his set of prints in the exhibition, "Dead Indian Stories," which are a response to the conditions of life for Indigenous peoples in the United States. The artist will discuss some of the many issues that Native people face today—including poverty, deficient educational opportunities, high rates of suicide, and lack of political representation—and how his artwork pays homage to the ongoing perseverance of Native nations.

RSVP Here via EventBrite.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Hock E Aye VI Edgar Heap Of Birds is an artist and an advocate for Indigenous communities worldwide. His work includes multidisciplinary forms of public art messages, large-scale drawings, Neuf Series acrylic paintings, prints, works in glass, and monumental porcelain enamel on steel outdoor sculpture. While representing Indigenous communities, his art focuses first on social justice and on the personal freedom to live within the tribal circle as an expressive individual. Heap of Birds’ work was shown in the 2007 Venice Biennale and has been exhibited at some of the most renowned institutions in the world. In 2012, he was named a USA Ford Fellow and in 2014 was honored as a Distinguished Alumni from the University of Kansas. Now retired from teaching at the University of Oklahoma after 30 years of service, he continues to serve there as professor emeritus.

View Event →
Opening reception, with a performance by ​Jaamil Olawale Kosoko
Mar
27
6:00 PM18:00

Opening reception, with a performance by ​Jaamil Olawale Kosoko

Opening Reception for In the Presence of Absence with a performance by Jaamil Olawale Kosoko - Chameleon (The EFA Installments).

Chameleon is a performance project created by Jaamil Olawale Kosoko that examines the shapeshifting, illegible, and fugitive realities of Black diasporan people. Using live feed and augmented reality media with complexity theory (the study of adaptive survivalist strategies inside complex networks or environments) as a choreographic device, this work explores how minoritarian communities record and affirm their existence through collaborative actions and protests that archive personal freedom narratives as a way to subvert culturally charged fields of systemic oppression, loss, and erasure.

RSVP Here.

View Event →
Is It Our Anger That Makes Us So Beautiful? a live performance by Amelia Bande
Mar
9
4:00 PM16:00

Is It Our Anger That Makes Us So Beautiful? a live performance by Amelia Bande

A collective rehearsal, glowing capsules of intimacy. Our corrugated
hunger will jump from the screen to the stage. Choreographed emojis
and memes. Sad songs performed live to send later via text message. Do
we live inside a miracle? 

Presented in partnership with Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory.

About the presenter:

Amelia Bande is a Brooklyn-based writer and performer from Chile. Her solo and collaborative work has been shown at Artists Space, The Poetry Project, Pratt Manhattan Gallery, Storm King Arts Center, Tang Museum, MoMA Library, MIX NYC, Abrons Arts Center, Participant Inc., BOFFO Performance Festival, and more. She has been an artist in residence at WORM Filmwerkplaats, The Shandaken Project and Yaddo. She is co-editor of Critical Correspondence, an online publication of Movement Research. Her chapbook The Clothes We Wear was published by Belladonna in 2017.

View Event →
Collective Strategies for Reparative Care: A Panel Discussion
Mar
2
3:00 PM15:00

Collective Strategies for Reparative Care: A Panel Discussion

Collective Strategies for Reparative Care: A panel discussion with  OlaRonke Akinmowo (creator, The Free Black Women’s Library), Kevin Gotkin (artist, activist, and professor), Ted Kerr (writer and organizer, What Would an HIV Doula Do?), Lana Lin (filmmaker, scholar, author of Freud’s Jaw and Other Lost Objects: Fractured Subjectivity in the Face of Cancer, 2017). A reception will follow the event. Presented in partnership with NYU Center for Disability Studies.

About the presenters:

OlaRonke Akinmowo is a Black feminist scholar, librarian and interdisciplinary artist who primarily works in collage, paper printmaking, and installation. She is also a set decorator, yoga teacher, and mom. Her work is informed by ritual, research, and identity. She aims to provide alternative contexts around race, gender and class, as well as examine the sacred aspects of history and culture. She sees life, nature and archives as necessary and sacred. In 2014 she birthed The Free Black Women’s Library, a public art project that centers and celebrates Black women writers, artists and activists. This biblio installation currently holds a collection of over one thousand books written by Black women, and features workshops, readings, performance, film screenings and critical conversation. It has been installed at the Studio Museum in Harlem, MOCADA Museum, Weeksville Heritage Center, Concord Baptist Church, National Black Theater and Nurture Art Gallery. Ola is a recipient of multiple grants and fellowships from varying organizations including the Brooklyn Arts Council, the Awesome FoundationCulture PushThe Laundromat Project and The Robert Blackburn Printmaking Studio

Kevin Gotkin’s work combines research, artistry, and activism. He studies forms of endurance and the ritualization of ableism in American culture. His current book project considers the histories of the telethon, danceathon, walkathon, and hackathon in the U.S. His previous research has been published in the IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, Disability Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Video Ethnography, and Porn Studies. Kevin’s teaching interests include media studies methodologies, identity politics, disability theory, and media production. In 2015, he won the university-wide Penn Prize in Excellence in Graduate Teaching from the University of Pennsylvania.  In 2016 with Simi Linton, he co-founded the Disability/Arts/NYC (DANT), an activist organization that seeks to advance the aesthetics and artistry of disability in NYC. This work has been funded by the Mertz Gilmore Foundation and the Cultural Agenda Fund administered by The New York Community Trust. The activism can be seen reflected in the city’s first cultural plan, CreateNYC, and in public programming around the city, including “An Etiology of Omission” at The Whitney Museum in the fall of 2017. 

Canadian born Theodore Kerr is a Brooklyn based writer, organizer and artist whose work focuses on HIV/AIDS, community, and culture. Kerr is a founding member of the What Would An HIV Doula Do? collective, a community of people committed to better implicating community within the ongoing response to HIV/AIDS. Their work has been featured in The Body,  Art in America and POZ magazine. With Aldrin Valdez, Kerr is a co-founder of Foundational Sharing, a performance and publishing platform. Since 2013, Valdez and Kerr have hosted 5 Foundational Sharing salons, and been invited to produce the event with the Bowery Poetry Club, CUNY, Visual AIDS and Queer Art Mentorship. Creating postcards, posters, stickers, and collages, Kerr's art practice is about bringing together pop culture, photography and text to create fun and meaningful shareable ephemera and images. Collaboration is a big part of Kerr's art practice. He has made work with Zachary Ayotte, L.J. Roberts, Chaplain Christopher Jones, Niknaz Tavakolian, Bridget de Gersigny, Malene Dam and others. He has been in exhibitions curated by Kris Nuzzi, Sur Rodney (Sur), Danny Orendorff and others. Two of his works, in collaboration with Shawn Torres and Jun Bae, are part of DePaul Art Gallery's permanent collection.  

Lana Lin is a filmmaker, artist, and writer whose creative practice concerns embodied vulnerabilities. She has produced a body of experimental films and videos that interrogate the politics of identity and cultural translation through attention to the formal capacities and historical contingencies of moving image media. Since 2001, she has focused on collaborative multi-disciplinary research-based projects (as Lin + Lam) that examine the construction of history and collective memory. Lin’s works have been screened and exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art and Whitney Museum, NY, Stedelijk Museum, Gasworks, London, UnionDocs, Brooklyn, Oberhausen Film Festival, Taiwan International Documentary Festival, and China-Taipei Film Archive, among others. She has received awards from the Javits Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, Jerome Foundation, New York State Council on the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts, and has been a fellow at the MacDowell Colony, Civitella Ranieri, and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics. Lin is the author of Freud’s Jaw and Other Lost Objects: Fractured Subjectivity in the Face of Cancer,which examines the psychic effects of cancer through studies of three important creative and intellectual figures: Sigmund Freud, Audre Lorde, and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick. She recently completed a feature-length personal documentary that “re-visions” Black feminist poet Audre Lorde’s 1980 memoir, The Cancer Journals. An Associate Professor in the School of Media Studies at the New School, Lin is currently a fellow of the New School's India-China Institute.

CDS Logo.png
View Event →
ICI hosts CURRICULUM with Becca Albee, Macarena Gómez-Barris, Stamatina Gregory, Jeanne Vaccaro and Sarah Zapata
Feb
25
6:30 PM18:30

ICI hosts CURRICULUM with Becca Albee, Macarena Gómez-Barris, Stamatina Gregory, Jeanne Vaccaro and Sarah Zapata

PLEASE NOTE THIS EVENT IS HELD AT ICI:
401 Broadway, Suite 1620
New York, NY 10013 

Join ICI for a conversation about the EFA Project Space exhibition CURRICULUM with curators Stamatina Gregory and Jeanne Vacarro, artists Becca Albee and Sarah Zapata and scholar Macarena Gomez-Barris. In a format redolent of consciousness raising groups and spurred on by key questions from each participant we’ll be workshopping ideas central to the exhibition’s inception: the relationship between curatorial practice and pedagogy, with a focus on structural critiques of self-help, fostering group intimacy, and thinking through decolonial thought and aesthetics.

The exhibition CURRICULUM, at EFA through March 16, reimagines collective study outside of cultural institutions and creates pathways for resistance by asking the questions: What would a curriculum for collective study and political action look and feel like? Can simply being present together be a form of learning, a way of transforming one another? What is recuperable from decades past? What can we do that we have not yet done?

The practices and research taken up in CURRICULUM connect with the ideas and questions taken up by several of ICI’s programs internationally, most notably Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. with ICI’s investment in DIY culture, archives, hapticality and a capacity for queering our everyday. This event intends to introduce commonly engaged practitioners in New York through their respective elected affinities to consider and process current global and regional dynamics cultural producers from different fields are grappling with in the context of New York.
This event is free and open to the public. To attend, please RSVP here

ICI
401 Broadway, Suite 1620
New York, NY 10013 

This event is accessible to people with mobility disabilities. Please contact ICI for additional accessibility needs.

View Event →
The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions
Feb
24
2:00 PM14:00

The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions

The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions: a discussion of Eloquent Rage by Brittney Cooper.

About the presenter:

OlaRonke Akinmowo is a Black feminist scholar, librarian and interdisciplinary artist who primarily works in collage, paper printmaking, and installation. She is also a set decorator, yoga teacher, and mom. Her work is informed by ritual, research, and identity. She aims to provide alternative contexts around race, gender and class, as well as examine the sacred aspects of history and culture. She sees life, nature and archives as necessary and sacred. 

 In 2014 she birthed The Free Black Women’s Library, a public art project that centers and celebrates Black women writers, artists and activists. This biblio installation currently holds a collection of over one thousand books written by Black women, and features workshops, readings, performance, film screenings and critical conversation. It has been installed at the Studio Museum in Harlem, MOCADA Museum, Weeksville Heritage Center, Concord Baptist Church, National Black Theater and Nurture Art Gallery. Ola is a recipient of multiple grants and fellowships from varying organizations including the Brooklyn Arts Council, the Awesome FoundationCulture PushThe Laundromat Project and The Robert Blackburn Printmaking Studio

Support the growth of the library through the Patreon page, and follow its progress on Instagram, Facebook and Tumblr.

View Event →
Letting Go: A reading by scholar and critic Jennifer Doyle
Feb
15
6:00 PM18:00

Letting Go: A reading by scholar and critic Jennifer Doyle

Letting Go describes the experience of being stalked by a student, and offers an extended reflection on the psychic costs of living with harassment.

About the presenter:

Jennifer Doyle is a Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside. Currently, she is working on a collection of essays on art and sport. She is also writing about paranoia, harassment and the workplace. In 2015, she curated Nao Bustamante: Soldadera, for the Vincent Price Art Museum. She is also the curator of “The Tip of Her Tongue,” a feminist performance art series presented by The Broad Museum, in Los Angeles. She is a member of the Board of Directors at Human Resources, Los Angeles, a space dedicated to performance-based and interdisciplinary experimental art.


View Event →
The Free Black Women's Library Literary Sessions
Feb
13
6:00 PM18:00

The Free Black Women's Library Literary Sessions

The Free Black Women's Library Literary Sessions: February - Honoring Alice Walker and Audre Lorde.

The Literary Sessions honor Black women authors born in that month. Guests are welcome to come and listen to readings of these author’s work and possibly be inspired to write, draw and create what they feel based on the reading or the prompts offered.

About the presenter:

OlaRonke Akinmowo is a Black feminist scholar, librarian and interdisciplinary artist who primarily works in collage, paper printmaking, and installation. She is also a set decorator, yoga teacher, and mom. Her work is informed by ritual, research, and identity. She aims to provide alternative contexts around race, gender and class, as well as examine the sacred aspects of history and culture. She sees life, nature and archives as necessary and sacred. 

 In 2014 she birthed The Free Black Women’s Library, a public art project that centers and celebrates Black women writers, artists and activists. This biblio installation currently holds a collection of over one thousand books written by Black women, and features workshops, readings, performance, film screenings and critical conversation. It has been installed at the Studio Museum in Harlem, MOCADA Museum, Weeksville Heritage Center, Concord Baptist Church, National Black Theater and Nurture Art Gallery. Ola is a recipient of multiple grants and fellowships from varying organizations including the Brooklyn Arts Council, the Awesome FoundationCulture PushThe Laundromat Project and The Robert Blackburn Printmaking Studio

Support the growth of the library through the Patreon page, and follow its progress on Instagram, Facebook and Tumblr.

View Event →
The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions
Jan
27
2:00 PM14:00

The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions

The Free Black Women's Library Book Sessions: a discussion of TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NEGRO GIRLS by Camille Acker.

About the presenter:

OlaRonke Akinmowo is a Black feminist scholar, librarian and interdisciplinary artist who primarily works in collage, paper printmaking, and installation. She is also a set decorator, yoga teacher, and mom. Her work is informed by ritual, research, and identity. She aims to provide alternative contexts around race, gender and class, as well as examine the sacred aspects of history and culture. She sees life, nature and archives as necessary and sacred. 

 In 2014 she birthed The Free Black Women’s Library, a public art project that centers and celebrates Black women writers, artists and activists. This biblio installation currently holds a collection of over one thousand books written by Black women, and features workshops, readings, performance, film screenings and critical conversation. It has been installed at the Studio Museum in Harlem, MOCADA Museum, Weeksville Heritage Center, Concord Baptist Church, National Black Theater and Nurture Art Gallery. Ola is a recipient of multiple grants and fellowships from varying organizations including the Brooklyn Arts Council, the Awesome FoundationCulture PushThe Laundromat Project and The Robert Blackburn Printmaking Studio

Support the growth of the library through the Patreon page, and follow its progress on Instagram, Facebook and Tumblr.

View Event →
Curatorial Walk-Through for Curriculum
Jan
16
5:00 PM17:00
The Angry Heart: AIDS, Art, Activism
Nov
17
4:00 PM16:00

The Angry Heart: AIDS, Art, Activism

Elia Alba,  Hands (Sacred Heart 1) , 2013. Silk screen on fabric, wire, fiberfil, acrylic and thread.

Elia Alba, Hands (Sacred Heart 1), 2013. Silk screen on fabric, wire, fiberfil, acrylic and thread.

Presented in partnership with GMHC.

The Angry Heart: AIDS, Art, Activism will convene a panel of artists, New York-based arts organizations, and the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to engage in a discussion exploring the inter generational relationship between art, activism, and the HIV/AIDS crisis in New York City.  Moderated by As Far as the Heart Can See artist, Ivan Monforte. Panelists include: Linda Earle (Board Member, Art Matters), Lucia Torian (Director, HIV Epidemiology Program, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene), Esther McGowan (Executive Director, Visual AIDS), Gonzalo Casals (Executive Director, Leslie Lohman Museum), Travis Chamberlain (Managing Director, QUEER | ART), and Luna Ortiz (Artist; Senior Community Health Specialist, GMHC).

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GHMC) is the world’s first and leading provider of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy. Building on decades of dedication and expertise, we understand the reality of HIV/AIDS and empower a healthy life for all. GMHC fights to end the AIDS epidemic and uplift the lives of all affected. To learn more about GMHC or how you can donate, volunteer, tour the agency, or become a client, visit gmhc.org, contact GMHC by email, or call 212.367.1000. GMHC is located at 307 West 38th Street, New York, NY 10018.

This event takes place in conjunction with As Far as the Heart Can See (September 21 – November 17, 2018).


View Event →
The Non-Professional Development Workshop
Nov
10
3:00 PM15:00

The Non-Professional Development Workshop

Crop1mt-nder-nonprofessional-broadside.jpg

The Non-Professional Development Workshop
In partnership with the Artists Alliance Inc. (AAI)

This workshop brings together artists from EFA Project Space, Artists Alliance Inc., and other organizations for a conversation on the topic of the over-professionalization of the arts.

Professional development programs endeavor to give artists the practical tools to survive in the art world in this time of rising expectations, and education and living costs.  This training, with its emphasis on “how to emerge, how to network and build your name” is often focused on art as a means of production for the market, instead of art as a form of creative expression.  In its well-intentioned mentoring on strategic planning for the career track, it --purposefully or not-- sets expectations about what constitutes professional success, constraining the possibilities for making art and being an artist. The Anti-Professional Development Workshop seeks to provide alternative approaches, reflections and humor on the evolving realities of the creative person and extend the definition of what it means to be an artist in the 21st century. This event will be presented in collaboration with Artist Alliance Inc.

Founded in 1999, Artists Alliance Inc. (AAI) is an artist and curator-centered 501c3 non-profit organization committed to supporting emerging and underrepresented contemporary artists. Through innovative programming, experimentation and collaboration, AAI serves as a resource and forum to engage the community of the Lower East Side.

PARTICIPANTS

Bill Carroll is director of the Studio Program at EFA.

Mary Ting is a visual artist working in installation, drawing, sculpture, and community projects that examine cultural history, grief and nature.  Her varied work reflects on our stories - our devotions and desperations. Recent solo exhibitions in the NYC area include Lambent Foundation, Dean Project, metaphor contemporary art, and Kentler International Drawing Space and at the Wake Forest University, North Carolina.   International group shows include: Social Justice and the Right to be Human at the Athens School of Fine Art, Greece; 2011 Art Stays 9 ,Slovenia; 2009 International Women’s Biennale, Incheon, Korea; and the Sofia Paper Biennial, Bulgaria. A two-time recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship,  2016 Joan Mitchell Center New Orleans Residency, 2016 Lower Manhattan Cultural Council  In Process Residency, 2010 Gottlieb Foundation individual grant, Lambent Fellowship,  Pollack Krasner Foundation among others.  Residencies include MacDowell Colony, Lower Eastside Printshop Special Editions, Dieu Donne Papermill Workspace, and others. Mary Ting currently teaches at CUNY John Jay College in the studio art department and the Sustainability and the Environmental Justice Program.  She is also  faculty at Transart Institute MFA Program, New York/Berlin.  Mary is an avid gardener certified master composter and citizen She is also a frequent lecturer, independent curator and writer.  The crazed ravaging of the earth, the displacement of vulnerable communities and pending extinctions is what keeps her up at night and also awakens her in the morning. She is currently researching and writing about Chinese Modern History, Trauma, and the Lust for Endangered Species Parts.  Mary has a bachelors degree from Parsons School of Design, NYC, a diploma from the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing in Chinese folk art studies, and a masters degree from the Vermont School of Fine Art. 

Jodi Waynberg is Executive Director at Artists Alliance Inc.

Martha Wilson is a pioneering feminist artist and gallery director, who over the past four decades created innovative photographic and video works that explore her female subjectivity through role-playing, costume transformations, and “invasions” of other people’s personae. She began making these videos and photo/text works in the early 1970s while in Halifax in Nova Scotia, and further developed her performative and video-based practice after moving in 1974 to New York City, embarking on a long career that would see her gain attention across the U.S. for her provocative appearances and works. In 1976 she also founded and continues to direct Franklin Furnace, an artist-run space that champions the exploration, promotion and preservation of artists’ books, installation art, video, onliine and performance art, further challenging institutional norms, the roles artists play within society, and expectations about what constitutes acceptable art mediums.

This event takes place in conjunction with As Far as the Heart Can See (September 21 – November 17, 2018).

View Event →
Linda Mary Montano: AGING AS ART and Billy X Curmano: Performing for the Dead
Nov
3
6:30 PM18:30

Linda Mary Montano: AGING AS ART and Billy X Curmano: Performing for the Dead

Image courtesy Linda Mary Montano

Image courtesy Linda Mary Montano

This event will bring together two of the movers and shakers of the performance art and art in everyday life fields in the U.S. for a participatory engagement with the audience dealing with the presenters’ experiences with aging and dying. Montano sees her body as a canvas, a sculpture that is chiseled by time as she grows older. Curmano has daringly orchestrated his own funeral in order to perform for the dead, and as an act of self- transformation: a rite of passage.

MY MOTHER ARTIST TEACHER AND FRIEND documents Mildred Kelly Montano's art-life and ability to make art a tool of healing and self therapy.  She was my first art teacher and demonstrated how I could do the same, that is, turn my pain into beauty. During the video, we will all be invited to performatively interact with sound and use my mother's courage as inspiration and a way to create  good medicine for ourselves. Transformation is always available. 

Curmano says: “Artists often paint fantasies, I've tried to live mine and as such I was buried alive for three days in 1983. The trappings of a traditional Italian Wake, New Orleans style Jazz Funeral and International Postal Exhibition about death were primarily for the living. The strenuous preparations followed by a seven-day fast, burial and creative output in extreme and isolated conditions served as an initiation and perhaps doorway to new levels of artistic development for me, but in the end it was all quite simply a "Performance for the Dead."

PARTICIPANTS

Linda Mary Montano is a seminal figure in contemporary feminist performance art and her work since the mid 1960s has been critical in the development of video by, for, and about women. Attempting to dissolve the boundaries between art and life, Montano continues to actively explore her art/life through shared experience, role adoption, and intricate life altering ceremonies, some of which last for seven or more years. Her artwork is starkly autobiographical and often concerned with personal and spiritual transformation. Montano’s influence is wide ranging – she has been featured at museums including The New Museum in New York, MOCA San Francisco and the ICA in London.

Billy X. Curmano is an award winning artist/adventurer and former McKnight Foundation Interdisciplinary Art Fellow. He was trained as a painter and sculptor (If, of course, painters and sculptors can be trained). His more traditional objects have been exhibited both here and abroad since a first solo show at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee in 1970. Notably, some of his paintings represented the USA in the “III Vienna Graphikbiennale” (Austria). His works have also found their way to the Museum of Modern Art in New York and other prestigious collections. Billy X. came to music through the back door using soundscapes in “live art” and is probably best known for edgy performances. His more eccentric pieces include a 3-day live burial, 2,000 plus mile Mississippi River Swim, 40-day Death Valley Desert Fast and a sojourn to the Arctic Circle on public transport. He’s won awards for performance and film as well as a solo CD. Billy X. has toured every way imaginable including 6,200 miles and 15 cities in 45 days on a Greyhound Bus and intrigued audiences from the Dalai Lama's World Festival of Sacred Music in Los Angeles to New York City's famed Franklin Furnace. He's been a "Pick of the Week" in the L.A. Weekly and on the City Pages "A List". Journalists have dubbed him the court jester of Southern Minnesota. He has been fortunate to study briefly with John Cage, Rachel Rosenthal, Babtundi Olatunji and Joseph Shabalala.

This event takes place in conjunction with As Far as the Heart Can See (September 21 – November 17, 2018).  Additional support provided by: Reimagine End of Life — a citywide event exploring big questions about life and death.

Billy X. Curmano, Performance for the Dead

Billy X. Curmano, Performance for the Dead

View Event →
Screening: Beth Stephens’ and Annie Sprinkle’s Good Bye Gauley Mountain: An Eco-Sexual Love Story (2013)
Nov
1
6:30 PM18:30

Screening: Beth Stephens’ and Annie Sprinkle’s Good Bye Gauley Mountain: An Eco-Sexual Love Story (2013)

Image courtesy of  Beth  Stephens and Annie Sprinkle

Image courtesy of Beth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle

The screening will be accompanied by organic popcorn and ice-cold limeade, and will be followed by an open discussion on current ecological as well as gender-related issues. The subject of this film is as relevant today as it was when it was made in 2013, as current U.S. presidential orders have been dismantling major laws respecting the Earth. 

Goodbye Gauley Mountain: An Ecosexual Love Story is an autobiographical documentary exploring the “pollen-amorous” love affair between artist-couple Beth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle, and the biodiverse Appalachian Mountains. This documentary follows Stephens and Sprinkle on a journey home to Beth’s native West Virginia, to talk to rural community members, environmental activists, family and friends in order to speak out against mountain top removal (MTR) mining practices, which are destroying the forests, towns, and people they love.

Link to preview: http://sexecology.org/projects/goodbye-gauley-mountain-an-ecosexual- coming-out-story/

Q&A Participants

Lillian Ball is an ecological artist/activist working on wetland issues with a multidisciplinary background in anthropology, ethnographic film, and sculpture. She exhibits and lectures internationally, receiving fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, NEA and NYFA. She is a Ramsar Culture Network member, an advisor for the NYSDEC Awards, and a longtime appointee of Southold Land Preservation Committee. Ball’s ongoing WATERWASH® project series combines long-term public art with native habitat restoration, storm water remediation, and conservation through educational outreach. The original prototype transformed a water access park and was funded by the Long Island Sound Futures Fund as a concept that can be adapted to coastal situations worldwide.  WATERWASH Bronx River, is an innovative collaborative green infrastructure solution to runoff pollution. Rocking the Boat job-skills apprentices planted 10,000 native plants. It cleans commercial parking runoff before entering the river, opened private property to pubic use, and was funded by the NYS Attorney General’s Office. http://www.lillianball.com/

Brooke Singer engages technoscience as an artist, educator, nonspecialist and collaborator. Her work lives “on” and “off” line in the form of websites, workshops, photographs, maps, installations, public art and performances that often involves participation in pursuit of social change. She is Associate Professor of New Media at Purchase College, State University of New York, a former fellow at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center (2010-11), co-founder of the art, technology and activist group Preemptive Media (2002-2008) and co-founder of La Casita Verde (2013-) a community garden and living lab in South Williamsburg, Brooklyn. She is in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, Microsoft and Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond Learsy. http://www.brookesinger.net/

About the filmmakers

Annie Sprinkle was a New York City prostitute and porn star for twenty years, then morphed into an artist and sexologist.  She has passionately explored sexuality for over forty years, sharing her experiences through making her own unique brand of feminist sex films, writing books and articles, visual art making, creating theater performances, and teaching. Sprinkle has consistently championed sex workers’ rights and health care and was one of the pivotal players of the Sex Positive Movement of the 1980's. Sprinkle has been collaborating on art projects with her partner, an artist and UCSC professor, Elizabeth Stephens. They are movers and shakers in the new “ecosex movement,” committed to making environmentalism more sexy, fun and diverse.

Beth Stephens is an interdisciplinary artist, activist and a professor at UC Santa Cruz. Her visual and performance work has explored themes of the body, queerness, and feminism for over 25 years.  She has exhibited and performed in many museums, galleries and theaters across the U.S. and Europe, such as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Vortex in Austin,  PS1 in New York City, the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid, Spain and the Museum Kunstpalast in Dusseldorf, Germany. SexEcology is the current focus of Stephens’ research. Stephens and Annie Sprinkle coined the term and have been developing this new field of research over the course of their twelve-year collaboration. They shift the metaphor of Earth as mother to Earth as lover, to inspire others to engage in a more mutual relationship with nature and with each other.

This event takes place in conjunction with As Far as the Heart Can See (September 21 – November 17, 2018).

View Event →
In Honor Of …
Oct
20
1:00 PM13:00

In Honor Of …

Image courtesy of Amelia Iaia

Image courtesy of Amelia Iaia

A performance series in the gallery hosted in conjunction with EFA Open Studios. Performers were nominated by artists featured in As Far as the Heart Can See, and include former mentees, current students, assistants, and younger artists whose work they admire: Nina Isabelle, Sindy Butz, Elena Bajo, Xinan (Helen) Ran, and Larissa Gilbert.

PARTICIPANTS

Elena Bajo is an artist, choreographer and cofounder of the LA collective D’CLUB dedicated to climate action. Her artistic practice occurs at the intersection of anarchist thought, social ecology and metaphysics, engaging ideas of nature, and the body as a political and social entity questioning its relationship to ecologies of capital. She works both individually and collectively, using an interdisciplinary approach, sculpture, performance, architecture, life sciences, text and video. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Audemars Piguet award, ArcoMadrid and the Botin Foundation International Visual Arts Grant award. She has exhibited widely in the U.S. and abroad. She divides her time between America and Europe. Bajo’s performance at EFA is supported by a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts and in-kind support from Spain Arts and Culture.

Sindy Butz is a New York-based interdisciplinary visual artist, somatic movement educator, and Butoh dancer. Butz's research-based practice spans the disciplines of performance art, body art, multisensory installation, performance-based photography/video art, contemporary ceramics, and olfactoric projects. In her time-based work, she investigates belief systems, ideologies, sociopolitical transformation processes, identity, human biology, memory formation, and the collective unconscious. Butz recently concluded the Linda Mary Montano Art/Life Institute residency in Kingston and has been nominated for the Greenwich House Pottery Residency. She has exhibited nationally and internationally. She earned a B.F.A. in sculpture from AKI- ARTez Netherland, and an M.F.A. in Art in Context from the University of the Arts (UdK), Berlin Germany.

Larissa Gilbert is an artist and filmmaker based in Los Angeles, CA. They received their BFA from the Cooper Union in New York City. Larissa’s work investigates the presence of European myth, fairytale, and ritual in cinema and pop culture and how this affects community segregation, racial hierarchy, and gender binaries in the United States. Past and current research includes My Little Pony, Greek Mythology, Playboy, Barbie, Sorority Hazing, and Cults. Recently, they have exhibited and screened their work at the Nakanojo Biennial in Japan, Anthology Film Archives, and the historic Cooper Union Great Hall.

Nina Isabelle is a process-based artist working with language, perception, action and phenomena. As a way to reveal information lateral to everyday awareness, Isabelle builds systems designed to locate, decipher and authenticate instinct, choice, action and awareness. Her approach aims to tether the collective, personal, and regional narratives that drive the performance space machine toward trajectories of new perception, belief, and possibilities.

Born and raised in China, Xinan (Helen) Ran received her BFA from Pratt Institute in 2017 and is an incoming Hunter College MFA Painting candidate. Her multimedia exploration constructs fabricated memories via defamiliarized norms and textures. Xinan is a 2016 Ox-Bow fellow and an alumnae of Pearson College UWC (2013).

This event takes place in conjunction with As Far as the Heart Can See (September 21 – November 17, 2018).

View Event →
Ongoing: Ivan Monforte – "There But For the Grace of God Go I"
Sep
29
to Nov 17

Ongoing: Ivan Monforte – "There But For the Grace of God Go I"

Image courtesy Ivan Monforte

Image courtesy Ivan Monforte

Saturdays: September 29, October 13, October 27, 12:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Saturday, November 17, 12:00 – 4:00 PM, followed by a panel discussion with GMHC and invited guests from 4:00 - 5:30 PM.

A social sculpture by Ivan Monforte, inviting the public to participate in free and confidential HIV testing administered by Gay Men’s Health Crisis.

RSVP on Facebook

ARTIST

New York-based artist Ivan Monforte was born in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. He received a B.A. from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1996, and an M.F.A. from New York University in 2004. He attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2004.  He has shown at Bronx Museum of the Arts, Longwood Art Gallery, Queens Museum of Art, El Museo del Barrio, Artists Space as part of PERFORMA05, Elizabeth Foundation Gallery, Aljira, a Center for Contemporary Art, La MaMa Galleria, and Socrates Sculpture Park.  He is the recipient of a UCLA Art Council Award, a Lambent Fellowship in the Arts from the Tides Foundation, and an Art Matters grant for research in Samoa.  He has participated in residencies at Sidestreet Projects, Lower East Side Print Shop, and Center for Book Arts.

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GHMC) is the world’s first and leading provider of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy. Building on decades of dedication and expertise, we understand the reality of HIV/AIDS and empower a healthy life for all. GMHC fights to end the AIDS epidemic and uplift the lives of all affected. To learn more about GMHC or how you can donate, volunteer, tour the agency, or become a client, visit gmhc.org, contact GMHC by email, or call 212.367.1000. GMHC is located at 307 West 38th Street, New York, NY 10018.

This event takes place in conjunction with As Far as the Heart Can See (September 21 – November 17, 2018).

 

View Event →
As Far as the Heart Can See Opening Reception
Sep
21
6:00 PM18:00

As Far as the Heart Can See Opening Reception

Image: Beth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle, Blue Wedding to the Sea, 2009.

Image: Beth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle, Blue Wedding to the Sea, 2009.

Please join us for the opening reception for As Far as the Heart Can See, curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful.

Friday, September 21, 2018
Curatorial Walkthrough: 5 pm – 6 pm
Opening Reception: 6 pm – 8 pm

Opening night performances by "Threat Level 3" (Billy X Curmano, John Pendergast and Steve Smith) and Praxis (Delia and Brainard Carey).

Artists: Nao Bustamante, Billy X. Curmano, Irina Danilova & Project 59, Beatrice Glow, Ivan Monforte, Linda Mary Montano, Praxis (Delia & Brainard Carey), Beth Stephens & Annie Sprinkle, and Martha Wilson & Franklin Furnace Archive

Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful — whose elusive creative path embodies intimacy, healing, empathy, and radical generosity — As Far as the Heart Can See focuses on figures who parry institutional canons and over-professionalization to pursue art as a call to the heart. In the words of Linda Mary Montano, this is art that “gives one permission to…”

Highlighting longform and durational work, the exhibition also features performance documentation, ephemera, manifestos, interviews, and artist proposals culled from nearly 20 years of the Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art; a testament to the transient and intransigent lifework of cultural producers.

Artists fatigued by pressure to both make and “be” objects, take note: As Far as the Heart Can See assembles those who have shifted gear, broken away, found shelter in the wilderness, or ventured astray from art-historical validation in order to find truth. Many of those in As Far as the Heart Can See refer to what they do as a ‘vocation,’ suggesting bold acts and a readiness to trade normative success for something more. These artists construct new art worlds and disrupt disciplines such as ecology, healthcare, thanatology, gender studies, economics, anthropology, and social work.

 

View Event →
In Perpetuity: Tenants Meeting
Jul
13
6:13 PM18:13

In Perpetuity: Tenants Meeting

Image: courtesy of Wong Kit Yi

Image: courtesy of Wong Kit Yi

In Perpetuity: Tenants Meeting
Friday, July 13, 2018
6:13 - 9:30 PM


Join us for a a public conversation-wanting-to-be-podcast hosted by Wong Kit Yi and Sarah Demeuse, followed by a closing reception for Seven Senses.

Wong's film "Uploading Consciousness to a Lotus Root" (2018) is the common ground for set of questions exploring the conundrum of "How long is forever?" Seeking answers from genetics, biotechnology, legal contracts, and people like you, Wong Kit Yi and Sarah Demeuse will weave their findings into a living dispersed organism, reminiscent of a magic mushroom.

We begin at 6:13 PM sharp. Please make sure your phones are charged and minds are expandable!

The evening continues with a closing reception for the SHIFT Residency Exhibition, Seven Senses, on view from June 15 - July 14, 2018.

Gallery Hours: Wednesday - Saturday, 12 - 6 PM

View Event →
Cut Tongue Heart Speak with Natalie Diaz and Tania Willard
May
3
6:00 PM18:00

Cut Tongue Heart Speak with Natalie Diaz and Tania Willard

Tania Willard,  Only Available Light , from the series  Only Available Light , 2016. Archival film (Harlan I. Smith,  The Shuswap Indians of British Columbia , 1928), projector, selenite crystals and photons. Film 8:44. Original composition by Leela Gilday. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Tania Willard, Only Available Light, from the series Only Available Light, 2016. Archival film (Harlan I. Smith, The Shuswap Indians of British Columbia, 1928), projector, selenite crystals and photons. Film 8:44. Original composition by Leela Gilday. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Cut Tongue Heart Speak with Natalie Diaz and Tania Willard
In partnership with Endangered Language Alliance
Thursday, May 3, 2018
6 - 7:30 PM

Please RSVP to projectspace@efanyc.org.


Language revitalization and reclamation is central to the practices of a generation of Native Artists moving between urban and rural communities. Artist Tania Willard and poet Natalie Diaz will have a public discussion about the motivation and struggles behind learning to speak Secwepémcstin (Secwépemculecw/Interior Salish, British Columbia, Canada) and Mojave (Arizona, USA) respectively—learning the languages of their parents as a second language and as a subject that informs their different disciplines. The discussion will focus on the value of inherent meaning, and knowledge contained in distinct languages. Presented in partnership with Endangered Languages Alliance (Brooklyn), an organization providing opportunities for education and outreach around the preservation of the estimated 800 languages spoken in New York.

PARTICIPANTS

Tania Willard is from the Secwépemc Nation, Interior British Columbia. She works within the shifting ideas of contemporary and traditional as it relates to Indigenous cultural arts and production. Her curatorial projects include Beat Nation: Art Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture, The Vancouver Art Gallery with Kathleen Ritter, Unceded Territories: Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun at the Museum of Anthropology with Karen Duffek, Nanitch: Historical BC photography, and Landmarks2017/Repéres2017. Her art practice centres around BUSH gallery, a site of land-based experimental and conceptual Indigenous art futurity.

Natalie Diaz was born and raised in the Fort Mojave Indian Village in Needles, California, on the banks of the Colorado River. She is Mojave and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Tribe. Her first poetry collection, When My Brother Was an Aztec, was published by Copper Canyon Press in 2012. She is a Lannan Literary Fellow and a Native Arts Council Foundation Artist Fellow. She was awarded a Bread Loaf Fellowship, the Holmes National Poetry Prize, a Hodder Fellowship, and a PEN/Civitella Ranieri Foundation Residency, as well as being awarded a US Artists Ford Fellowship. Diaz teaches at the Arizona State University Creative Writing MFA program. She splits her time between the east coast and Mohave Valley, Arizona, where she works to revitalize the Mojave language.

COMMUNITY PARTNER

The Endangered Language Alliance (ELA)
is an independent non-profit based in New York City and the only organization in the world focused on the immense linguistic diversity of urban areas. Many of the New York area’s estimated 800 languages are highly endangered; for many, New York is a major center. ELA documents and describes underdescribed and endangered languages, educating a larger public and collaborating with communities.

This event takes place in conjunction with #callresponse (March 23 - May 5, 2018).

View Event →
Apr
28
4:00 PM16:00

Feet on The Ground Performance

Feet on the Ground.gif

Saturday, April 28, 2018
4 - 6 PM

Please RSVP to projectspace@efanyc.org.

Feet on the Ground is a participatory group performance and art collaboration that asks, 'how do we decolonize ourselves?' Featuring a custom-made toolbox containing items designed by artists Esther Neff, IV Castellanos, and Maria Hupfield, the artists invite the audience to participate in empowering the collaborative and considerate by making new items for the toolbox using materials provided onsite. Conducted as an ongoing series of performances, each one informing the next, this project brings together survival strategies of politically-minded performance artists.

The artists will introduce new items, and collaborate in the space with visitors and invited guests during regular gallery hours, leading up to this two-hour performance. For EFA's iteration of #callresponse, the artists have created a custom bookshelf and triangular bench-style pedestal. Unlike the military term “boots on the ground” the title Feet on The Ground is one where direct community interaction and liberation of the undressed foot takes priority over combat. Previous iterations of this project were performed in New York at MAWA Gallery, Bullet Space, and Emily Carr University of Arts and Design (Vancouver, Canada).

PARTICIPANTS

Maria Hupfield
is martin clan, Anishinaabe and a member of Wasauksing First Nation, Ontario, based in Brooklyn NY. Her solo traveling exhibition The One Who Keeps on Giving premiered at The Power Plant in 2017 and was featured in Art in America. She is the first Indigenous Artist Resident at ISCP 2018, has performed and exhibited at Site Santa Fe Biennale 2016 and is a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptures Award. She is a member of Social Health Performance Club and co-owns Native Art Department International with artist Jason Lujan.

IV Castellanos is a trans Bolivian-American sculptor and abstract performance artist based in Brooklyn, NY. They were a 2017 AIR Chez Bushwick resident with collaborator Amanda Hunt and Gibney Work Up 2017. IV is Founder of the IV Soldiers Gallery 2014, Founder of the Feminist Art Group 2015 in collaboration with Esther Neff and is a regular performing member of the Social Health Performance Club.

Esther Neff is an artist, organizer, and independent theorist whose work deals with forms-of-life, mentalities, social gathering, and ways-of-seeing (theories and beliefs). She is the founder of Panoply Performance Laboratory (PPL), a lab site in Brooklyn, a performance-making collective, and thinktank. Neff’s performance work (solo and as/with PPL) has been performed at Momenta Art, The Kitchen, The New Museum, Dixon Place, Bronx Museum, 14 Wall Street (NYC) as part of festivals in Chicago, Berlin, Copenhagen, and elsewhere across the USA and around the world. She is also the instigator of Brooklyn International Performance Art Foundation (BIPAF), PERFORMANCY FORUM, and is currently co-opening a life-art lab in St, Louis called MARSH (Materializing and Activating Radical Social Habitus) with her mother.

This event takes place in conjunction with #callresponse (March 23 - May 5, 2018).

View Event →
Honoring Our Sisters Roundtable
Mar
28
6:00 PM18:00

Honoring Our Sisters Roundtable

Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Honoring Our Sisters Roundtable
Presented in partnership with AMERINDA
Wednesday, March 28, 2018
6 - 8:30 PM


Please RSVP to projectspace@efanyc.org.

Honoring Our Sisters Roundtable is led by Indigenous women in conversation with guest respondents working at the intersection of art, advocacy and radical solidarity building with Indigenous peoples. Work from the exhibit will serve as a point of departure for conversation on ethical collaboration, recentering institutional power, and critical accountability to Indigenous Nations leading the movement for resurgence, decolonization, and reclamation of their homelands in North America. Participants include: Audra Simpson, Professor Anthropology Columbia University, Crystal Migwans, PhD Native Art History, Columbia University, Tarah Hogue, Senior Curatorial Fellow, Indigenous Art, Vancouver Art Gallery, with guest respondants Rocio Aranda-Alvarado, Senior Curator El Museo del Barrio, Jaskiran Dhillon, Assistant Professor of Global Studies and Anthropology, The New School, Carin Kuoni, Director/Chief Curator, Vera List Center for Arts and Politics, The New School, and Melissa Iakowi:he'ne' Oakes, Social Advocate and Organizer, American Indian Community House,. Moderator: Maria Hupfield, Artist.

PARTICIPANTS

Audra Simpson is Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. She is the author of Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States (Duke University Press, 2014), winner of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association’s Best First Book in Native American and Indigenous Studies Prize, the Laura Romero Prize from the American Studies Association as well as the Sharon Stephens Prize from the American Ethnological Society (2015). She is co-editor of Theorizing Native Studies (Duke University Press, 2014). She has articles in Theory & Event, Cultural Anthropology, American Quarterly, Junctures, Law and Contemporary Problems and Wicazo Sa Review. In 2010 she won Columbia University’s School for General Studies “Excellence in Teaching Award.” She is a Kahnawake Mohawk.

Crystal Migwans is an Anishinaabekwe of Wikwemikong Unceded First Nation, and the place she calls home is the Mahzenahzing (Painted) River. A multimedia artist by training, Crystal's path turned to research and community arts during her time as Curatorial Assistant at the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation in M'Chigeeng, Canada. She is currently in the Art History PhD program at Columbia University in New York, where she look for echoes of an Anishinaabe artistic legacy in the archives of the colonial metropolis.

Tarah Hogue is a curator and writer of Métis and Dutch Canadian ancestry. She is the inaugural Senior Curatorial Fellow, Indigenous Art at the Vancouver Art Gallery and was the 2016 Audain Aboriginal Curatorial Fellow at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. Hogue was curator in residence with grunt gallery between 2014-2017, and has curated exhibitions at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Or Gallery, and SFU Gallery.

Rocío Aranda-Alvarado was born in Santiago de Chile. She is the Senior Curator at El Museo del Barrio in New York City, where she is working La Bienal 2018 El Museo’s biennial of emerging artists and A Brief History of (Some) Things, an exhibition exploring the persistence of Mesoamerican and Indigenous Caribbean imagery in contemporary art. She organized Presente! The Young Lords in New York, and Antonio Lopez: Future Funk Fashion, both nominated among the best exhibitions for 2015 and 2016 by numerous publications. Aranda-Alvarado teachers Contemporary U.S. Latinx Art, Modern and Contemporary Latin American art at The City College of New York. Publications include catalogue essays for the Museum of Modern Art, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (National Gallery of Art, Washington DC), and El Museo del Barrio, Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art, Art Nexus, Review, the journal of the Americas Society, NYFA Quarterly, BOMB and American Art.

Jaskiran Dhillon is a first generation academic and organizer who grew up on Treaty Six Cree/Métis Territory in Saskatchewan, and an Assistant Professor of Global Studies/ Anthropology, The New School New York. Her first book Prairie Rising: Indigenous Youth, Decolonization, and the Politics of Intervention (2017), provides a critical account of settler state violence in the lives of Indigenous Youth.

Carin Kuoni (M.A. University of Zurich; B.A. Sorbonne) is director/chief curator of the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School and teaches at The New School. A founding member of the artists' collective REPOhistory, Kuoni has curated and co-curated numerous transdisciplinary exhibitions on issues such as contemporary Native American identity and colonial, 19th-century portraiture; democratic, participatory processes; artistic and social networks; new notions of transient and temporary spaces; or agency. Kuoni is the recipient of a 2014 Andy Warhol Foundation Curatorial Fellowship, directed SITAC XII: Arte, justamente in Mexico City in 2015, and is a Travel Companion for the 57th Carnegie International in 2018.

Melissa Iakowi:he'ne' Oakes is a Mohawk woman, Snipe Clan. She resides in Akwesasne Mohawk Territory, where she was born and raised, and New York City. She has trained in northern and southern tribal art, fashion, business, politics, leadership and studied in Montréal, NYC, Shanghai, Beijing, and Hong Kong. At an early age, she experienced Canadian Army tanks in her backyard, blockades on her street, and no school due to military occupation on her reservation territory for months at a time. Activism is a central part of Iakowi:he'ne' life experience from the Oka Crisis, to Idle No More, the Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign, and NoDAPL to the Mohawk Warrior Society. 

Maria Hupfield is martin clan, Anishinaabe and a member of Wasauksing First Nation, Ontario, based in Brooklyn NY. Her solo traveling exhibition The One Who Keeps on Giving premiered at The Power Plant in 2017 and was featured in Art in America. She is the first Indigenous Artist Resident at ISCP 2018, has performed and exhibited at Site Santa Fe Biennale 2016 and is a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptures Award. She is a member of Social Health Performance Club and co-owns Native Art Department International with artist Jason Lujan.

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Established in 1987, American Indian Artists Inc. (AMERINDA) is a community-based multi-arts organization that works to empower Native Americans and foster intercultural understanding of Native culture. Located in New York, AMERINDA is the only Native American multi-arts organization of its kind in the U.S., and has been widely recognized for its artistic and cultural integrity.  In addition to curated exhibitions of contemporary art, AMERINDA’s new non-fiction volume, No Reservation: New York Contemporary Native American Art Movement, distributed by D.A.P., reveals a previously hidden history of contemporary Native American art in New York City. The publication marks the first time that a diverse group of Native visual and performing artists, filmmakers and writers has been defined and given a name.  The encounter of Native practices and influences with mainstream art in New York City, created a community in which relationship between art and indigenous sensibility was recognized and nurtured. The Movement is the only such movement of its kin outside of Santa Fe, NM and and important part of American history.

This event takes place in conjunction with #callresponse (March 23 - May 5, 2018).

View Event →
Ursula Johnson, Ke’tapekiaq Ma’qimikew: The Land Sings with Jennifer Kreisberg and Laura Ortman
Mar
25
1:00 PM13:00

Ursula Johnson, Ke’tapekiaq Ma’qimikew: The Land Sings with Jennifer Kreisberg and Laura Ortman

Ursula Johnson.jpg

Sunday, March 25, 2018
1 - 3 PM
The High Line - 14th Street Passage
(Between W. 13 & W. 14)
Rain location: EFA Project Space

Please RSVP to projectspace@efanyc.org.


Ursula Johnson invites Tuscarora singer Jennifer Kreisberg and Brooklyn-based violinist Laura Ortman to collaborate and create a song from and for the land. Ke’tapekiaq Ma’qimikew: The Land Sings is a series of ongoing performances or “visitations” inspired by Indigenous song lines—singing the land—as a navigational and relational practice. For this iteration Johnson and Ortman will use duration performance, song, violin and drum to enact their relations and responsibility to the land and waters of Lenapehoking / New York. Sited on The High Line, an elevated greenway built on a repurposed rail line, the New York visitation highlights the way humans have impacted the landscape, displacing the voices of Indigenous peoples.

PARTICIPANTS

Ursula Johnson is the winner of the 2017 Sobey Art Award. She is an interdisciplinary artist and an enrolled member of the Eskasoni First Nation Mi’kmaq Community on Cape Breton Island based out of Dartmouth NS. Active in Mi’kmaw language revitalization and descendent from a long line of esteemed basketmakers, her nationally touring solo show Mi'kwite'tmn (Do You Remember) considers the consumption of traditional knowledge within colonial institutions. Johnson was awarded The Hnatyshyn Foundation Reveal Indigenous Art Award 2017.

Jennifer Kriesberg (Tuscarora, North Carolina) comes from four generations of Seven Singing Sisters through the maternal line. Kreisberg opened the Women’s March in Washington DC. She is an accomplished singer, composer, producer, teacher, activist and member of the critically acclaimed Native women's trio Ulali. Frequently called upon to guest lecture and conduct vocal workshops throughout the United States and Canada, Kreisberg has worked in film and television and toured extensively internationally. Performance venues include Carnegie Hall, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, The Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian, The Olympics, and elsewhere. 

An inquisitive and exquisite violinist, Laura Ortman is versed in Apache violin, piano, electric guitar, keyboards, and pedal steel guitar, often sings through a megaphone, and is a producer of capacious field recordings. She has performed at The Whitney Museum of American Art and The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal, and the Centre Pompidou, Paris, among countless venues in the US, Canada, and Europe. Ortman founded the Coast Orchestra in 2008, an all-Native American orchestral ensemble performing a live soundtrack to Edward Curtis’s film In the Land of the Head Hunters (1914), the first silent feature film to star an all-Native American cast. She is the recipient of the Jerome Foundation Fellowship 2017, Art Matters 2016, Native Arts and Cultural Foundation Fellowship 2016, Museum of Contemporary Native Arts Social Engagement Resident 2015 and the 2014/15 Rauschenberg Residency.

This event takes place in conjunction with #callresponse (March 23 - May 5, 2018).

View Event →